Rise From The Ashes

From Military Pilot to Sales Guru: The Resilience of Tim Goering

October 10, 2023 Baz Porter® Season 2 Episode 1
Rise From The Ashes
From Military Pilot to Sales Guru: The Resilience of Tim Goering
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Sharing the spotlight with us is Tim Goering, a tenacious sales and leadership coach whose life journey is one of courage, resilience, and adaptability. From soaring through the skies as a Marine Corps pilot to navigating the challenging terrains of Wall Street, Tim's story is a testament to his unyielding spirit and grit. We dive into his compelling narrative that spans his early years as an Air Force Colonel's son, his time at the Naval Prep School, his Marine service, and his successful transition into sales, running a startup bank and eventually launching his own business. Tim's story is rich with insights and lessons on embracing change and the influence of his military background on his life.

Today's episode is not just about career transitions; it's about overcoming personal struggles and finding strength in adversity. Tim gives a candid account of his battle with learning disabilities and how he turned them into opportunities for growth and resilience. He imparts invaluable leadership lessons about controlling reactions and making conscious choices. Similarly, I share my encounters with stoic philosophy, overcoming personal fears, and the life-altering lessons I gleaned from actor Gerard Butler's inspirational journey. If you've ever faced a setback and are searching for the courage to bounce back, this episode is an absolute must-listen. It's packed with life lessons, inspiring stories, and practical wisdom. Don't miss out!

Support the show

Friends, our time together is coming to a close. Before we part ways, I sincerely thank you for joining me on this thought-provoking journey. I aim to provide perspectives and insights that spark self-reflection and positive change.

If any concepts we explored resonated with you, I kindly request that you share this episode with someone who may benefit from its message. And please, reach out anytime - I’m always eager to hear your biggest aspirations, pressing struggles, and lessons learned.

My door is open at my Denver office and digitally via my website. If you want to go deeper and transform confusion into clarity on your quest for purpose, visit http://www.ramsbybaz.com and schedule a coaching session.

This is Baz Porter signing off with immense gratitude. Stay bold, stay faithful, and know that you always have an empathetic ear and wise mind in your corner. Until next time!

Baz Porter:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to another episode of Rise from the Ashe s podcast. I'm your host, Baz Porter, and I'm privileged and honored to have a guest with me today. His name is Tim and I'm going to let him introduce himself, because I'm completely rubbish at introducing anybody. Just they introduce people all the time, whatever. Do it yourself, because you are the best person to speak about you. I'm just here as a part of furniture. So, tim, please introduce yourself to the people here, the listeners, and tell them about who you are and what you do.

Tim Goering:

All right. Well, I'm Tim Goering, and you know I almost with Baz. It introduced me because it's a little easier. My story never sounds real in the first place. But the for 10 years I've been nothing but a sales and leadership coach. I do a lot with communications, by the way, it doesn't matter what kind of coaching you're doing, communications always creeps in. Do a lot with negotiations as well, and it's just kind of something. I started after a lifetime of struggling to find that system that makes it work and then I finally found the standard selling way and that's that's the system that I use and couldn't be happier with it. If I go backwards in my life, I'll give you the short version. We can fill it in later. But I was born in Dittberg, germany, son of an Air Force Colonel, and he kind of moved me around my whole life to keep me moving right. That's the best way to make yourself less susceptible to terrorist attacks, I suppose. But I graduated from high school in Bowie, maryland, when he was at the Pentagon, went off to the Naval Academy Prep School, which is the long way of getting into the Naval Academy for jocks and prior enlisted guys and sons of diplomats, those kinds of things. So I fell into the jock category, got out of the Naval Academy and flew lots of different airplanes mostly insertion and extraction, search and rescue in the United States Marine Corps. Had a great life and then had two kids, and anybody who's had kids knows that changes your goals and your aspirations. So I got out and went to work selling coronary heart stents, at first for Johnson and Johnson, and decided man hospitals were all the sick people are. So I need to make some changes. And went to work on Wall Street hard to argue, there aren't sick people there too, I suppose. But the went to work for a firm that they really kind of specialized and hiring military guys that they thought would run through walls, basically with a little bit of sales experience, and they started right at the beginning of stock is ownership and a company and upon is alone and I'm like way slow down. I'm taking notes. So a lot of learning along the way, had a great experience there and ultimately got recruited over to a big bank that had just bought a hedge fund and I wound up working for the hedge fund and that was a great experience relative return, hedge fund only, working with families with $25 billion or more so it was exciting. I got to hear stories of very, very, very successful people and what they did to not just make it but keep it and get it to the next generation, which was ultimately their goal. They got more money than they could spend, which led me to a gentleman that started a federally chartered startup bank in 2006. And I just asked him if I could watch right, because I don't know much about banking, but I know that's where they keep the money, so I think that would be a good idea to learn about. And ultimately, through the process, he asked me to become the president of South Florida. So we opened up a bunch of branches, hired some people, didn't leave in brothers and Bear Stearns went out of business overnight and led to a banking collapse. It was great for me because we didn't have any bad loans, because we didn't have any loans right, we were brand new. That little journey led me to being recruited to the Bank of New York Mellon my last corporate job where ran the state of Florida Wealth Management Division and my biggest frustration was hiring people that could really do it. And that's what led me to Sandler. One of my best employees decided to hire a Sandler coach, so I went to check him out and I was sitting there doing the math on the people in the room and thought, gosh, I think I want to be what this guy is. So I literally retired from banking and spent my life fortune starting his business 10 years ago. And here I am sitting with Bass.

Baz Porter:

I love that story. I mean, people aspire to be different things and you were very versatile within your approach to not just your business but your life as well, coming from an X minute, growing up with a military background, going into the military and diversifying when you came out. A lot of people who are veterans get really lost and I don't have a direction. I was one of them back in the day and you're of the caliber of personnel that went from. What can I do with this? Not. How has this affected me? You haven't gone down that rabbit hole like many others do, and you did something with it and you modeled, I suppose, other people in very successful areas, if you can describe that. Was there any habits you gained along the way that, the rituals that really stuck with you?

Tim Goering:

Well, maybe one in particular, now that you mentioned it, because the way you said that I adapted which I really never really gave that any thought that but I can remember as a young man because my father was in the Air Force. We moved every two or three years and I can remember complaining about it at one point right, obviously I'm losing all my friends will ever fit in, and between fifth grade and tenth grade I did five different schools in five years. So what I learned from that experience was to be really good at change, and I'll never forget there was one particular. I don't even remember which move it was, but I was. I was complaining to my dad and he said well, tim, why don't you just do this? It's not like he was a philosopher or anything, but he really did seem to have an answer. He said when we move to this next place, why don't you just take everything that you didn't like about your reputation and your personality and just don't do that anymore? And then take whatever it is that you liked about the other kids that you were in school with and do more of that? I was like, all right, I wouldn't even sure if he was serious and I started doing that Right. You just model the people that you're around, do the things that look like people are attracted to and avoid doing the things that are obviously not attractive, and good things will happen.

Baz Porter:

There's an outside people, there's a you know, you've heard of this and many others have successfully as clues yeah, it does. And modeling people. There's a fine line with this modeling people, not copying people, because people do this and we're all guilty of it. I have been. I've gone to model something and it ended up doing exactly what the other person is doing and I've lost myself in the process. What's the difference in your, in your, in your respect of modeling something rather than doing what the others is doing? How are you defined as different and how have you put your touch on to what you do in your business and sales today?

Tim Goering:

Well, oddly, the name of my company is Making Luck, and it really was a jab at my brother in 1995. He and I were trying to start a computer company together so we could help companies put computers on their desks so they could talk to one another through the intranet and send electronic memorandums. This was cutting edge stuff in 95. And my brother said well, you're gonna need an email. Email had just come out. We were using it a little bit in the Marine Corps, but not a lot and definitely not effectively. And so I made my email Making Luck. And the idea was he always used to tell me well, timmy, you're just lucky, you got into the academy because you're lucky, you got to date that girl because you're lucky, you got that job because you're lucky. And my punch back at it was dude, I put myself out there, I'm not afraid to fail. I would rather fail trying than not try. And it's not that I wasn't afraid of failing, I didn't like failing, I just like winning more. And I liked it when the odds were stacked against me. And what I found to your point on Success Leaves Clues is there were clues, there were basic things that you can do every day. You can wake up a little bit earlier than the other guy, you can show up to practice a little bit earlier, you could stay a little bit later, you can run a little bit harder. So I just kind of looked at what people were doing around me and then I used that to manifest my own luck. Information and education will only take you so far, so you got to take in everything. But then you got to use application and modification. You got to make it your own, sprinkle your own personality on it, and the transformation on the backside is incredible. I mean really just incredible. You put in the work, the results come out the other side.

Baz Porter:

That's a huge distinction there for so many people. People expect to have miracles or things just handed to them these days and it doesn't work like that. In terms of comparisons, that I got shown and taught from my mentors If you look at an Olympic athlete, they trained for 20 plus years to run 10 seconds on a track. Yeah, and it's the distinction of there's 20 years of blood, sweat, tears and pain behind that 10 seconds.

Tim Goering:

Yeah.

Baz Porter:

And that hit me when I was like, oh, rip, oh, and he didn't go back into my forces days. Most of our time was training. It wasn't actually doing operations, it was trained to go on the operations, right. People say, oh, you're doing a place, go. No, it was literally boring Most of the time it was absolutely mind-boggling boring because we were training, yeah, but it's that that keeps you alive, it's that that keeps that edge to get me to that next level. So, the more you train in something or towards that goal, but then you go I've got the information, as you said, right, I've got the application for it. Now you've got to trust and repeat that process. Yeah, that's the part most people not most a lot of people miss because they fail, because they give up or they fall. Yeah, when they fall, they go oh, I'm done. They don't get back up, they don't dust themselves off, they don't look at what went wrong or why they failed, yeah, and they don't go to that next level. Yeah, and a lot of people have modeled people, others, people who are successful. They've seen the clues and tried to get there, but they're not that person. What distinguish you from being? The transition into your person, the true self of who you are now. What was the pivotal point going? I'm not going to do that because I'm not him or them. How can I put my touch to it?

Tim Goering:

I don't know if I discovered that until recently or looking back In the military. I'm sure you'll appreciate this. Every single mission, we briefed it, we executed it, we debriefed it. And in the civilian world, the debrief. I never saw that You're coming out of a cockpit in a marine helicopter. The first thing that you do, aside from going to the restroom, I suppose, is you go right to the ready room and you debrief the mission. What did we do that could have killed us? Let's not ever do that again. I call it putting it to bed now. Brief it B, execute it E and then debrief it. Once I kind of realized, wow, that formula still works. Then I started coaching people on that. What are you trying to do? That's the briefing, the preparation that you put into it mentally and physically. Am I ready for this mission? What exactly am I trying to do? Boldly say it. How are you going to debrief it and say I hit my goal or I didn't hit my goal? If you don't even have a goal Front-site, post, rear-site aperture, slow, steady, trigger pull to the rear You've got to be concentrating and focusing on the right stuff. Then go and execute the mission. Give it your best, be adaptable. The mission never goes as planned and you've got to be ready to change on the fly and then come back and debrief it, and I do that with everything in my life. So I ask myself what went right, what went wrong and let's fix it. There's got to be a better way. That's that modification piece. But I don't think most people do. They keep doing the same stuff over and over.

Baz Porter:

Which is why they tend to not finish and complete what they were supposed to be doing. You mentioned something there about managing, basically managing as you go. When did that concept occur to you? How did you manage yourself through each section of your business? Obviously, you go through the banking side of it into what you're doing now. Were you always managing your life or your businesses, or did the concept just slide in there somehow?

Tim Goering:

Yeah, I would say it slipped in. It was a. I think as a kid I had a learning disability. It beats me what it was. It was never diagnosed, I think if I went back now, I don't even know what I want to know. I put a label on anything, but I did know this when I was a kid. I couldn't memorize anything. I still won't know my multiplication tables. Only now I think it's funny. Back then it wasn't very funny. It was something I had to hide from everybody, didn't know my shapes, didn't know my colors, didn't know my left hand from my right hand, and I could not remember that stuff. And what happened, though, is I learned to adapt, and I learned out you learn much later in life that if I rely on my memory, then what seven plus or seven times nine is, I might forget it, but if I know how to drive it, that's better. And that ability to drive stuff, to fake it on the fly and I really do mean it I was faking it In everything I did. I just I believed in that. Fake it to you, make it and then hope you make it before your luck runs out philosophy. And that, really, all I was really doing was just compensating for my failures, and I think when you realize you're not good at something and you're willing to move on, take everything you learned from that last experience and move on to the next one. It's a benefit in life. When I discovered the slide tackle in soccer early on, I thought I could use it for everything, because my father he was a hockey coach, not a soccer coach. He said either the ball gets behind the man, timmy, but never both. And I took that to heart. So if you got by me, I was definitely going to slide tackle you. But then my father pointed out hey, timmy, you're spending a lot of time on the ground and the game is supposed to be played on your feet. And I'm like I well, blah, blah, blah. And he said Timmy, if you're going to fall down, pick something up every time you're down. And I didn't know what he meant. I really did not know what he meant until much later in life and I realized, hey, every single time you fail, there's something you can learn from it. So pick something up while you're down there, like the guy got by. Or if I'd been on my feet still, I could have made that play. And if you learn from it. You can build on all that. Oh, that failure. So I guess I'm a good loser.

Baz Porter:

I'm on how to put it. That's that's. I love that. That's great.

Tim Goering:

Yeah.

Baz Porter:

You know you mentioned your father was a role model for you Other than him, and you can elaborate on that and go and expand if you wish. Yeah, whether a leader is that you aspire or uses a role model throughout your career multiple careers, but you've had several to get what you are today. Or was it just as pure luck?

Tim Goering:

Yeah, well, pure luck in that I kept my eyes open. I like to walk around. I pride myself on being more awake, more aware than the average person. I don't know what it is, I'm just tuned in. I'm tuned into people's emotions and I would say, yeah, my father was my not just my only role model, or not just my best role model, but probably my only. And because he was the only constant right Every single time we moved, every role model I had in that town was removed from my atmosphere and I really did spend a lot of my life modeling myself. Now, not a very good image, I mean, he was a lot smarter than I was and he was a lot more driven and a little more risk averse than I am. I love taking risks. It drives him nuts and I always enjoyed that. And it never really hit me, baz, that I didn't have role models until I heard Matthew McConaughey talking about it and I don't even remember where the interview was. But somebody asked him who his hero was and he said my hero is me 10 years from now. And then you fast forward. Somebody re-interviewed him and said hey, did it ever work out? And he goes oh, you don't understand, I'm in a constant evolution, right. So my hero is always me, 10 years from now, and that's. I hate to rip off the guy, but it's pretty good philosophy. Matthew McConaughey is not one of my heroes, although there's good philosophy to be learned from anybody, and that's what I picked up from him is I think it was already doing it. I was always on this path of here's where I wanna be next, which is almost self-sabotage, right, because sometimes you fall into the trap of not celebrating the successes you have had, and I definitely don't do that. Well, I'm always moving on. Yeah, what's next? How do we build this? Where do we go here? Where do we go now?

Baz Porter:

I love that. What's the most impactful leadership lesson you've ever learned, whether it be learning the hard way or just picking up from someone like Matthew or another influencer, or even personal development, someone who's really taught you something that you were like oh my God, this is life-changing.

Tim Goering:

Well, this one is a work in progress. I've not yet mastered it, so I'll be open to that, but I'm going to. And that is a very simple theory. Your reaction is 100% your choice. So, no matter what adversity is thrown at you, right, and a bunch of it is out of your control the way you react to every situation is 100% within your control. You can control your temper. You can decide whether or not you're gonna get angry. You can decide whether or not you're gonna be afraid. Right, You're gonna still get that physiological response perspiration, hair standing up on the back of your neck but you can call that activation, energy, or you can call that emotion, fear, but you can react to it the way you want to. And when you decide that you are 100% in charge of how you react, the next step that you take, the action that you take, will have a greater influence on whether you get out of that pickle that you've gotten yourself into somehow. And the reason I say I haven't mastered it yet is because when I'm driving in the left-hand lane in traffic and somebody's going slow, my reaction is not what I'd like it to be. Just yet and there are a few other instances like I still have a low tolerance for bullies, but for the rest of my life I'd say I'm doing much better and I think that's the progress that you need. Right Reaction is my choice. What am I gonna do?

Baz Porter:

I love that and it's interesting you say a low tolerance, because you have got tolerance, but the level of it depends on the situation. And I love what you just said. You have a choice.

Tim Goering:

You do have a choice and sometimes the choice is tolerance, Even if the people that you're tolerating are intolerant of your intolerance. What the paradox of tolerance is a bear.

Baz Porter:

But it's the same as paradox, as failure and success. Somebody once told me that every major success is at least 15 years in the making. Mm yeah, love that. And you look at Dean Garziosi, you look at Bob Proctor any of the greats you know John Maxwell, jack Camphor any of these people.

Tim Goering:

Yeah.

Baz Porter:

They've had so many failures. No right, they've had so many bankruptcies, business failures. This can go on, but the one thing is congruent with all of these people they never gave up. They never threw in the towel. Now I've had stories, miraculous stories. There's a girl Jenna her name is who was on QVC and she was a billionaire overnight recently. But the day before she became that billionaire, they were looking to sell their own, all the rest of their macbooks and the rest of it to pay the rent and that last leg of faith. I'm going on this, this is what's gonna happen. And she'd done this before. She got turned down multiple times. It was turned away by some of the best makeup artists and producers in the world and then she was like, I says, our last attempt, we're gonna go be homeless tomorrow if we don't do this. And literally, she did a 15 minute session on QVC and sold over a billion dollars in 24 hours. Wow, because she wouldn't give up. And I've heard a story in numerous times and it's incredible. Yeah, but it's that not giving up, that awareness of I've learned. I'm gonna progress forward. This is what I have to adapt, this is where I have to go and this fast paced world, learning is essential and learning never stops. Drip books or materials. Have you learned? Not just at these sales skills that you teach, which are phenomenal, by the way, but other things in your life? What did you read anything? Did you watch podcast videos YouTube, very popular to gain information?

Tim Goering:

Yeah, I'll give you one good one and then a story that goes behind the other one, please. As far as I'm concerned, the best self-help book ever written is called Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill. It was originally written, by the way, in 1937. Yeah, if you go to Barnes and Noble, if you can find one, there'll still be seven brand new ones on the shelf for seven or eight dollars. So how can a book be that relevant over that many years? And, by the way, I think one of the major premises of that book is just don't give up. So you kind of were already hitting on it, that's. And the first time I heard the story of Don't Give Up, I was a young, impressionable 17 year old. Just checked into the Naval Academy Prep School in Newport, rhode Island, and my first commanding officer was by a guy by the name of Captain Richard Stratton, and he shot himself down in Vietnam, spent six years in the Hilton with Admiral Stockdale and he was telling us the story of Admiral Stockdale's philosophy. That's now called the Stockdale Paradox. You can read about it, people have studied it, and I was just a 17 year old kid listening to war stories from a war hero I didn't know, and what was fascinating, what the question was posed to Admiral Stockdale is how was it that you guys survived and there were others that were capable Marines and sailors and airmen that didn't make it? What was the difference? And what Admiral Stockdale said was I didn't put a timeline on my success. I didn't put a timeline on getting out. What we told ourselves is we're gonna get out, and the people that said I'm gonna get out by Christmas, I'm gonna get out by the summer, we're hit with this devastation when it didn't happen. So they set these short-term goals that were lofty and then they had to deal with the devastation. If it didn't happen, god abandoned me, or whoever you wanna blame. And when you lose hope, when you lose that desire to keep moving forward, you lose everything. And he attributed it to stoic philosophy. And I don't know if you've ever studied any stoicism. I just fascinated with it. The best book I ever read by it is the Manual by Epic Titus. It's this thick and it's just right next to my John, so that's where I can be inspired. If you read one page a day for I don't even know how many pages are in there, I'm gonna say two or three months it'll change you as a person Because it addresses everything and those stoic philosophers just kind of said hey look, life happens to you and it's very much reaction is your choice, kind of stuff. I think some of that's probably in there, but it shaped my life when I found stoicism, my approach about death and anything that you're afraid of, and that's in thinking, go rich too. By the way, figure out what one of you I think they labeled the six biggest fears. I don't remember what they are that's correct, yeah? But I've conquered all six. I'm not afraid of any of them anymore. And I was afraid of all of them, I think, when I started that book. So it's a game changer.

Baz Porter:

What was the talk of the fears? What was the most challenging to overcome?

Tim Goering:

I think fear of failure is in there and fear of poverty is also in there. I combine those. I don't know why, but I thought that getting a job would be hard, maybe because I went through high school and college in the 80s and so I was watching people get out of college and go into the grind and I just thought maybe I'll never get a job and what will my life become? Well, how will I explain to people that I tried. I almost didn't get into the Naval Academy? I only got in there because a soccer coach recruited me and I wouldn't have gotten in otherwise, and I wasn't sure how I was going to explain that to people. So it's amazing what you can learn just by keeping going. It's interesting.

Baz Porter:

I mean people say they're at the top and I got a story share with me 10 minutes before I got married. It was by a guy called Gerard Butler and I met him in a healing retreat when we were getting married my wife and I were getting married in August Island and it always stuck with me. He said when you're at the top, there's always going to be someone trying to knock you off, but always view life as you're never at anything, but you're always on the journey and remember to enjoy that journey. And it's very preference what you said about fear of failure and all the rest of it, because people go oh, I'm going to get somewhere in a certain amount of time. But you can put that same emphasis on retirement. People move to certain parts in the country for retirement. But what does a retire actually mean? It means to stop purpose, stop life, stop going forward. And I heard that analogy. I was like I don't want to retire. Why would I want to do that? And it changed the whole philosophy of my life Never stop your purpose, never stop aspiring to be better than you are now, but never equally, put yourself down, because you're always on that journey. And it changed the whole like, wow, holy shit, mind blown. And now Gerald Butler before he became an actor, the day before he was spied, the day before he was going to be an actor, he was actually going to be an attorney. When he passed the bar, he was going to get his degree and all the rest of it, and he phoned his teacher, who was examining her, but said I don't want to be an attorney, I'm not coming in. And he was an alcoholic at the time. He was very much, you know, he was a mess and so I don't want this life. After he picked the phone up, put the phone down to his bar or whatever the termination from in Scotland, he picked up his agent, the number who lived in Los Angeles, and said I'm coming to a plane tomorrow to be an actor. And that's where his career started. Wow, you know he didn't give up. But he knew at the very early age that he didn't want to be an attorney. And when he was telling me this story, it was about you know why'd you share with you? It was like, wow, that's interesting. But he's another example of someone never giving up and the odds were stacked against him. And these stories inspire not just me, but so many other people. This is why this podcast exists. And what lessons can you provide, possibly for somebody else who's listening to this going well, I've just got, I've just failed, I've fallen down. What advice can you give them to possibly get back up again and dust themselves off? Obviously, you've had a few falls, and you've had, we all have. What advice would you? What's your best advice you would give to someone who's just just had a little fall.

Tim Goering:

So always tough, because the circumstances surrounding everybody's events are unique to them, right? So I can't imagine what anybody's going through. So I try to remove myself from that. But if you stop thinking about yourself a little bit and I know this sounds easier to say than to actually do right, but I don't even know if this is even true I heard it on, you know, I'm reading something one time. But anxiety and gratitude occupy the same space in your head and it's very difficult to be anxious and grateful at the same time. And I really do believe that when you adopt an attitude of gratitude and it sounds cliche, right, because it rhymes, but you know, if you just try to be grateful, try to give stuff away the way to take focus off yourself is pass on what you learn from whatever devastating events conspired to ruin your life. And make sure that somebody else isn't going to repeat your path. And somebody said to me once, started as a question how many seeds are there in an apple? I don't even know the answer, maybe it's six, maybe it's 12, who knows? But how many apples are there in a seed? And the metaphor there is who cares how many apples, how many seeds, are in an apple, right? What are you going to do with them? Anyway, they're poison, don't eat them, right? But if you plant those seeds, they'll turn into trees and those trees will bear fruit full of seeds and they'll fall to the ground long after you're gone, right, long after you're gone. The earth's been around for a long time. We can argue about it all day long how long? But all I know is this that's what I love about coaching that's why I know I'll never retire Is I'm having fun planting seeds in other people's brains. And when you stop thinking about yourself and you start thinking about how can I take what I went through and turn it into something good, even if I never get to seed the result, how am I going to plant those seeds anyway, with my last dying breath as I'm laying face down in the dirt after another beating. I'm going to dig a hole in the ground with my finger and plant one more seed so that nobody else has to go through that. And yeah, I think that's the fun of life is pass it on and then maybe it'll help. It helped me every time I've gone through something bad. I just stopped thinking about what we stem and figure out how I can, how I can pass it along somebody else so they don't have to walk in those stupid steps that I walked in.

Baz Porter:

Well, I love that and it's about passing it on and paying it forward. People, I think, miss that a lot. They go get it. It's not. It's not. A common is common but it's not common. At the same time, it's a paradox and they go down that rabbit hole of it must serve me before I serve somebody else. One of the things that I discovered was if you give more, you receive more in so many different ways.

Tim Goering:

And you won't even know it when it hits you. No you won't. And my kids are grown now, they're 26 and 29. But there's nothing makes me more proud in this world than when one of my kids comes home to visit me and we're walking around town or at my favorite Tiki bar and somebody comes up and says, oh hey, tim, I haven't seen you in a while. You changed my life. Or remember when you told me to do this or that or that thing in front of my kids. And then they start thinking well, maybe some of the stuff that he's saying might actually be worth listening to. Right, and my kids, I think you've learned lessons from the people around me, other positive male role models that I hang out. They don't listen to me. I'm their dad, I don't expect them to, but they learn things from the other people around me and the people I've influenced and it does come back.

Baz Porter:

Yeah, it's important to remember that for those now who are going through that transition, the more you get out, the more you will receive back. It's not just an abundance of financial abundance, but there's so much more to that word abundance Relationships, opportunities, legacies, building it forward, paying it, inspiring others. It's all how you view it. I love what you said about the gratitude, and there's actually scientific studies now that prove that you can be in grass unit fires off chemicals and endorphins and hormones in the brain that change the brain structures and then it rewrites the DNA coding and the RNA coding in your body over a longer period of time. There's scientific studies about this now. Joe Dispenser doesn't and people who are grateful or live in a state of intentional, perpetual attitude of gratitude, as you said, that cliche word have a better life. They truly do, but we get sucked into this avenue of hate, fear, lack and all the other words that we should get fed to is through commercial streams. You are not that and you're never going to be that. And having that awareness, as you said, tim, of moving past where you are now into the future, you are already that leader, whether you recognize it or not, you have the potentiality, because you have infinite and potentialalities in reality. Right now, your advice is and I can see why people gravitate towards you or come up to you with your kids and go you changed my life Because you're paying on that forward to other people. It's not done anymore. It's not done often enough. Where do you see yourself in a few years time? And you said not retiring, which is good news, yeah, where do you see? Where do you want to be? What aspirations do you have?

Tim Goering:

You know I want to keep on doing it the way I'm doing it right now. I gave up on that idea of retiring a long time ago, just because I think what drives me is the next step. I like change, I like what's new and I live a pretty good lifestyle. I live in the town. I want to live in the good news of moving 28, 29 times over the course of my life, some because of my dad, some because of me trying to be my dad. I live in the town I want to live in and I do the things I want to do for fun. When I'm done talking to you right now, I know my week is done Because my task list is done, which means I can put my outrigger canoe in the ocean and I can go paddle hard until I'm exhausted, and to me that's fun. And I like picking new things. I like to be in the water, so paddle boarding or sailing or boating or outrigger canoeing now I like to pick new ways to do it. But I live in the town I want to live in, I have my time, I work for myself. So if I'm doing this and I stay healthy and I stay mentally tuned in to those around me. That's a pretty good life. I can live the rest of my life doing what I'm doing right now.

Baz Porter:

I love that. Do you have any final words for any aspiring people who are wanting to teach sales or wanting to learn about what you do so they can get in contact with you? I'm going to put your contact details in the descriptions anyway, but what would be your best advice for the people who are wanting to start new businesses, or in sales or teach it?

Tim Goering:

Well, easiest way to get a hold of me is that email I mentioned earlier. It's still my email, believe it or not, makingluckatyahoocom, spelled exactly like that. I know it's not a real word, but m-a-k-i-n-g-l-u-c-k-a-yahoocom, and I pride myself. One of my cuss words is help. I don't help people. Here's what I do, though. I'll go on a journey with you. I'll share with you everything I picked up along the way, all the stupid mistakes that I made, and I will. I won't quit. I won't ever quit. You'll quit way before I do, and but if you join me on the journey, I can guarantee you this it'll be fun and it'll be hard. I'm not trying to make anything easy, and if you like that, then reach out to me and I'll do what I can with you, but not for you. I'm an empowerment guy, so that's where I am.

Baz Porter:

I love that, Tim, Thank you very much. Thank you very much for your time. It's a pleasure and I always said when we started it's an honor to have you in my world and in my circle. Your message is so valuable to so many people. Thank you.

Tim Goering:

Well, thanks for having me, Baz. It's always a pleasure. I'm happy to come back anytime. You want some insight on stupid stuff I've done.

Baz Porter:

Awesome. I'm more than happy to have you. I love stupid stuff. I guess it's all crazy and I guess it's a right place. Thank you very much, Tim, For myself and my listeners. Thank you very much for joining me today and please share and just be aspiring entrepreneurs. Remember you live life with purpose and you create with legacies. See you soon, Take care and have an amazing day.

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