Rise From The Ashes

Power of Deep Connections and Building Communities with Jordan Edwards

February 15, 2024 Baz Porter® Season 3 Episode 0
Rise From The Ashes
Power of Deep Connections and Building Communities with Jordan Edwards
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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered how a single moment can pivot the trajectory of your life? Jordan Edwards, a powerhouse in the coaching and podcasting sphere, joins us to share such a moment when Grant Cardone's insights reshaped his understanding of selling and accountability. In our latest episode, Jordan peels back the layers of his journey, from ambitious goal-setting to finding his purpose in the coaching realm. His story is a testament to the transformative power of self-reflection and personal development, underpinned by his five pillars of success—an approach born out of his financial consulting experience and the rigorous 75 Hard program.

They say fortune favors the bold, and my own podcasting adventure is proof of that. Starting with a spontaneous cellphone recording that bloomed into a vibrant podcaster community, this episode is a celebration of the unexpected. I recount the trials and triumphs of this wild ride, emphasizing the value of adaptability and the beauty of organic growth. Consistency, I've learned, is the secret sauce to success, whether you're behind the mic or facing life's curveballs. Our discussion unfolds, revealing how nurturing a community can lead to individual fulfillment and collective progress.

Our conversation takes a heartfelt turn, addressing a crisis that silently affects many: loneliness and mental health. Sharing candid experiences, including a life-altering encounter with a client on the brink, we underscore the lifesaving potential of just reaching out. With a staggering number of people feeling isolated, we reflect on the role we all play in creating communities where mental well-being is a priority. But it's not all heavy; there's also space for light, practical wisdom on cultivating rich personal relationships, from setting boundaries to financial transparency. Tune in to discover how voice memos and motivational folders might just be the keys to sustaining a positive outlook and deepening the connections that matter most.

Support the show

Friends, our time together is coming to a close. Before we part ways, I sincerely thank you for joining me on this thought-provoking journey. I aim to provide perspectives and insights that spark self-reflection and positive change.

If any concepts we explored resonated with you, I kindly request that you share this episode with someone who may benefit from its message. And please, reach out anytime - I’m always eager to hear your biggest aspirations, pressing struggles, and lessons learned.

My door is open at my Denver office and digitally via my website. If you want to go deeper and transform confusion into clarity on your quest for purpose, visit http://www.ramsbybaz.com and schedule a coaching session.

This is Baz Porter signing off with immense gratitude. Stay bold, stay faithful, and know that you always have an empathetic ear and wise mind in your corner. Until next time!

Speaker 1:

Good day to everybody and welcome to another episode of Rice and the Ashes podcast. I've got a return, a guest, here with me today. He's a legend in the podcast industry. His name is Jordan Edwards and he has his own podcast, his own platform very successful, and I really invite him back to share his message because I think what he does is so powerful in the world and the way he shows up for not just his clients but other people in his life. So, Jordan, without further ado, please say hello again to the world.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. Thank you, Baz, for having me on again. It's always a pleasure and I appreciate our time and our friendship together.

Speaker 1:

Thank you. It's the pleasure is actually mine, because I enjoy talking with you and sharing, sharing each other's knowledge, which is great. I want to start with your story of Piphany and how that, what, how you ended up doing what you're doing today. When we spoke about marathon resilience the last time, we all want to go into the business side of it with you today and really understand why you do what you do and how you got into the business that you're in at the moment.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely so for me. I've always found that when I am pushed against the wall, when I am challenging myself, I become a better version of myself, and that opens up opportunities. So this is going to bring us back to probably 2019, the beginning of 2019. I set three goals for myself. One was to run the marathon, which we've already discussed. One of them was to start a business. And then one of them was to pass all four sections of the CPA, and what ended up happening? There was the four sections of the CPA.

Speaker 2:

I realized midway through the journey that this isn't what I want to do. These are not things that I want to accomplish, because I looked down the line and I started speaking with people who have accomplished these things and I'm like they don't seem like it's not the path for me. So I realized that the coaching was, and the way I figured that out was through a couple different avenues. I started off going to actually Grant Cardone had an event. It was in Marlin Stadium, 35,000 people and everybody's selling something, and I had nothing to sell. So I left the event and the biggest takeaway I had is Jordan. You got to learn to sell something. I don't know what it is, but you have to sell something.

Speaker 1:

And show me the pen.

Speaker 2:

Yes, exactly I'm like and that's why I think events are so good is because I don't think it was ever the 10x. Their impression was never to go. Jordan needs to learn how to sell it's. You go to an event and then you take something, whatever it is, it's for you. So I definitely recommend to the audience is going to events is good. It opens your perspective, it broadens your horizons and a majority of the time they are so cheap in the disproportionate nature of what you're gaining, that it just makes sense to attend one of them or two of them or 10 of them.

Speaker 2:

As I bad as an event go or I'm an event go, it's just good to get outside of your circle. So I did that, learned that I needed to do. I had to sell something. So I started sitting there and I realized I'm thinking about Jordan. What do you have? What have you even accomplished? And I'm like I got an accounting degree from a good school. What else do I have? I'm like I have student loans. Who doesn't have student loans? There's a lot of people with that. So I started to look at it.

Speaker 2:

So I started to look at it and I realized that I could help people with the student loans because it was a tangible hey, you pay me this certain amount for this and I'm going to save you this amount. Make sense, easy, go with the flow. Started to do that, realize later on. And this is all the development of hey, I want to start a business. You never know what you're starting, but you eventually take reps and you get into it and you start to realize that people need accountability. So it's not like people don't have financial issues. They know what to do it's, but they need accountability. With that. And then, even deeper with that, what it established was the five pillars of Edwards Consulting, which are mental health, physical health, community, spiritual and relationships. And I realized that because when talking to someone about finances, it's so uncomfortable until you get to know them. So I realized that you had to build emotional war. You had to get to know who they are, what they wanted to accomplish through that. And then that posed me to take on more challenges, which were I did 75 hard and while I was doing that, which is Andy for sell, it's bad. Do you know what that is? Yes, yeah, awesome. So that, yeah, you're awesome. So 75 hard is to work out today drinking a gallon of water, reading 10 pages of personal development book, no alcohol, eating clean. Take a progress pitch 75 days. I did this in the beginning of 2020, in February, because I was like Jordan we have to make the most of our life, and I could imagine that there's people in the audience right now sitting there thinking how can I make this the most impactful three months of my existence? And that's what I would ask myself. I was because after that year of 2019, I realized that nothing is ever gauged unless we track. We have to measure and monitor to see results. So I constantly pushed myself to uncut and ask uncomfortable questions that led me to places of Jordan. What would happen if I did this Like how would you have the most impactful three months? What would that look like? I'm like they probably are doing something, they're probably doing good things. And it's funny because, when I think back on it, the 75 hard time when I was doing that, it wouldn't write into COVID and I just kept doing it. I thought COVID was great because I was like this is even better. I can do this all from home. I don't have any time constraints. So I was like 75 hearts easy. But the part I want to get to is that In that portion I ended up going to an airplane show with my buddy, franz Bernard, and he was doing 75 Heart as well, because we were trying to figure out something to do on the weekends that was productive.

Speaker 2:

So we thought why not go to the Naples Airplane Show and broaden our perspective and see what else is out there and see what buying a plane is, and maybe we'll run into someone, maybe there's an event, who knows? So we put ourselves out there and when we got there, in Naples Airport there's a small museum and it's a World War II museum. And when we went by I go this is bizarre because it's a very small airport and we're looking and the one guy running it goes you guys should read about this guy from the Vietnam War and I'm reading and he's a prisoner of war of seven years and I started to realize I'm like this guy has incredible story. This guy named Wayne Ogden Smith. How do I meet Wayne Ogden Smith? And I look up and I tell the guy I'm like that is absolutely incredible. Wayne sounds like an awesome guy. He looks at me and he chuckles in his like 80 year old tone he goes that's me and I'm like no way. And in that moment it just clicked for me where I go, wayne, I have a podcast and I'd love for you to be a guest on it. I didn't say this is my first podcast. I didn't say I've never done a podcast. I go, wayne, I have a podcast and I'd love for you to be a guest.

Speaker 2:

Because what was going through my head as I was reading this was realizing that if I have a conversation with this man, I wanted it to be cemented for life. I wanted it to be recorded and I wanted to make the most of it. What ended up happening was we recorded on my cell phone, on a recording app, for 15 minutes. Then midway through, he basically tells me and he's Jordan, I got, this is my job. I have to do this job. Come back to me next week.

Speaker 2:

So me and Franz drove to Naples the next week. I had no resources, I had nothing. I used my cell phone and we passed the cell phone around asking questions. That was my first podcast Then.

Speaker 2:

It's just crazy that we put such a constraint. Oh my God, I'm not that, I'm not this, I'm that. Don't no need to label yourself. You can be anything you wanna be. And I think that's so important for people to realize, because we sit there and we think that we can't change our identity on the drop of a hat. We can. And it's so important to realize that because that podcast led me to interviewing all these other people in a fairly quick timeframe and I wasn't even posting them until I had probably four or five months later when I'm like, oh wow, I actually have a podcast. I should do something about this, because I had to find someone to edit the videos, I had to find someone to do this, do that, and then there are components to it. But it's just. I went into my resources and I realized I don't know anyone who has a podcast and three years later I know hundreds with podcasts. Most of my friends have podcasts.

Speaker 1:

That's the thing, though you don't know what you've got until you've actually started something from nothing. So I love the fact that you went out there. You were very, very resourceful. You didn't look at what you didn't have, you worked with what you did have, and the result of that, first of all, this building resilience, building up that entrepreneur's age old skill of I can pivot. This is where we're going, and everyone else says you're nuts, what are you doing? You're crazy.

Speaker 1:

But in your mind and in most people who are visionary leaders, they look from the macro, they look at the helicopter view of things and they say, oh, I can see that there, these are all opportunities. How would you be more? Can you give an example or give a scenario where you could be more open to serendipity, rather than being in a closed mindset and just say I can't do it? And I'm doing it this way? I've met thousands of business owners and the first thing they say to me and I'm sure you've heard this as well I can't do it, because how can we be open to more opportunities and serendipity in our lives? And how does that show up with what you did?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I love that question and I think it's important to realize that we don't know what we don't know. There are so many people. If you're asking advice of someone and they recommend something to you, you can't go. Oh no, dude, that's stop. Stop, that's not the advice I want. You can't do.

Speaker 2:

If you were vulnerable enough to ask for advice or be willing to accept the advice, you have to sit there and consider does this make sense? And the way I started opening up serendipity and allowing these opportunities for myself with the podcast was, first of all, I had a couple different thought processes behind it. I thought how can this win? And I think that's really important because there's so many times that we don't allow that to happen. What is winning into a? What is me creating a podcast look like? And what does winning look like? Is winning me showing my kids when I'm a grandpa and I'm 80, 90 years old, going look at what I was doing at 25, interviewing the founder of Reebok? Is that winning to me?

Speaker 2:

I think that's what I thought winning was when I was starting, because I knew that this thing was. There was no guarantee that this was gonna explode. There was no guarantee that people were gonna watch. There's no guarantee that people were gonna listen. The only guarantee is that I was gonna talk to cooler and cooler people and it would build and build and it would compound and it would be something I would be proud of and it would build my network. Because at that time, everyone's sticking at home, covid's happening and the opportunity became endless because all of these incredible people are sitting at home going what do I do? What do I do? I travel every day. Well, how about my podcast? Yes, we'd like to. And you start getting yeses that you never would expect. And it was all because you put yourself out there and we're open to the opportunity.

Speaker 1:

I love that and it's the fact that you did put yourself out there. You had the courage and also foresight to go. I'm not gonna listen to the noise. I understand that I'm scared, I'm afraid of doing, but, like any good entrepreneur, you faced it and you overcome it and you roll the dice. And in that rolling of that dice, this is where success comes from, or distinguished amount of success. No one who is running a company or no one who is made pro-athlete did it by accident. They rolled that dice as well.

Speaker 2:

Yes, and I think that brings up a very good point of it's rolling the dice, but it's also showing up consistently. Yeah, I was telling you you're already ahead of this stuff ahead of me, but it's that understanding of you need to be there every single day. And even today I was telling Baz before we started I'm like I'm a little under the weather. Do you want to shoot next week? I'm like absolutely not, because this is on the schedule and this is what we're going to do.

Speaker 2:

And actually, a crazy little tip that happened to me when I was really getting momentum for the podcast was that I realized that I needed to start putting out clips, and so what I did was I hired someone to start clipping my content, and what that did for me was that guy caused me every single week I had to get him a new podcast. We start thinking about it Now, jordan can't skip weeks because the editor needs the podcast to edit it. And I'm like, oh my, and this forced me into the habit. So when it was, finally, I was done with that editor and I found a new editor and kind of moved on. I had the habit down that it's like Jordan, you can do this, like you can post every single week.

Speaker 1:

But it's also having that system and I get that. And for those people listening now thinking I can't start a podcast, I can't, can't be an entrepreneur, I can't start business, I had a conversation with somebody over a week and this she is a client, so I can't mention who she is but she said I can't do it because I've got all this to do. And she listed about I'm not joking about 127 things of why she couldn't do it. And I said I listened, I'm a good person, I just sat, listened. So when was the last time you built a seven figure business? It was just a simple question. She's, she's successful. She's got six, five, six figures, not consistently. But I said okay, but when did you last build a seven figure business or eight figure business? I haven't. I said so listen to me what I'm about to say. And she said okay, what about this? And I listed all of the things she's just said because I was writing notes frantically.

Speaker 1:

How does really hurt him? I never thought it was, and it's not, until you take an elevated view and step back from the mechanics of something and go what if? And that question from what if goes into yes, but yes and not no. But and most people, as you've experienced, especially when it comes to this dynamic of can't do something or that limited point of view, they go to no but and that's where they stay in your coaching, and not just in the podcast, but in your coaching. Is there any distinction that you've had already enjoy having these conversations, because you mentioned five different elements within your coaching. What do you most like about this and what distinctions do you have between each segment of where you help ascend that person?

Speaker 2:

It was the biggest change was the fact that many people going through life will gauge themselves if they get a promotion this year. They had the best year ever and I always sat there and I just thought to myself one day one activity does not reflect all three. How can we have a more fulfilling life, how can we have a better life for these things? And that's where I started to get in with clients, where it was what's your mental health like? And I asked that question, not because it's a weird question asking Baz, how's your mental health today. It's a weird question what?

Speaker 1:

My mental health screwed?

Speaker 2:

No, it is a great question, I'm teasing you, but no, I yeah.

Speaker 2:

It's a tough question, it's a weird question. Most people never get it and the reason I honestly started it and brought it up was because back when I was in college, my senior year, two years before that, I was living with this kid, jamal I mean roommates, and Jamal was my fraternity and Jamal always had the best attitude, very happy, like bringing a good vibe, and I remember he left for a year and then he came back. And when Jamal came back he was still trying to find himself. He was trying to figure out what school was for him, and whenever you ask a male, most of the time how are you doing? They're always like, good, fine, everyone's always closed off. So it's whatever it is what it is.

Speaker 2:

But with him he ended up deciding that life wasn't for him, which was terrifying, but especially for me, my senior year of college. I'm like, how can one of my best friends not like, how could I not know this? And it was just such a painful thing for me where I started to realize I'm like dude, if I ever talk to people on a serious note, I'm definitely going to ask them how their mental health is. I'm going to know like I don't want that to ever happen to anyone.

Speaker 2:

And now it's actually happened on the reverse, where I actually had a client who was suicidal and we ended up talking about it and we would talk weekly and I remember he was in Barcelona and I was getting on the phone at 430 in the morning and he's at 1030 and we're just talking and eventually he's Jordan, like you saved my life, and that was like one of my goals and it's not that like one life is. They're not equal at all, but it's more of a. I'm doing some good in the world. And the thing is that most of us listening don't realize the impact that we have on people, because it's the coaches have impact, yes, but the coaches get recognition for that impact. The friends never get recognition. The people there, the family, they never get that recognition.

Speaker 1:

What I love about what you just said, that you're an issue spent. You are emotionally aware of his need, whether he was willing originally to share that with you. And I've been in situations where I've. I was when I was traveling one good story, the full story. Now, when I was traveling I spent eight hours with somebody talking them off a bridge, so I get that completely. I know how impactful that can be.

Speaker 1:

But, to your point, we are not aware, and most men of our age I'm older than you, I'm an old bastard here yes, you say it's fine, but even from 18, 19 year olds now even younger than that these people are seriously contemplating, unaliving themselves this day and age. Number one is unacceptable. Number two how do we change that dynamic to open up these serious conversations? This is why I love what you do and the way you approach it. You ask me a direct question how you doing. Is your mental health okay? Are you gonna do something that we need to know about so we can help you with it? These questions are not asked and the distinction from asking the direct question or not Is that the distinction.

Speaker 1:

Of this person will analyze themselves or will they open up to that person? Is it willing to hold that space for them. That's resilience in itself. Doesn't take courage to do that. That takes emotional awareness, emotional intelligence and also resilience for that person to hold that space, because it's not an easy space to be in. You've run marathon, not one marathon, but you've run marathons. You've done 75 days straight in a very disciplined arena. What's the difference between resilience and the courage in them sort of things? Because they're very auspicious places to be in, especially when you don't know what you're doing or even to handle that conversation.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I would bring that up, that in regard to most of the time, what ends up happening is that the people feel like there's a loneliness pandemic and a lot of people feel alone.

Speaker 1:

I have the actual statistic on that and it is 76% of Americans admit to this day that they feel more alone and even when they were around people, because they don't feel heard.

Speaker 2:

76 of Americans. That's insane, yeah, and there's 350 million Americans. That's a ton of people. That is a ton of people. And just when Baz is looking to stop real quick, I'll just add in the point to basically counteract that loneliness thing is to build a group, and most people think it's only a friend group. Not true at all. There's spiritual groups, there's coaching groups, there's speaking groups, there's softball teams, kickball teams, anything you can think of. There are streaming groups, there's Reddit groups. There's all different types of groups.

Speaker 2:

I started a group and it's been one of the most impactful things because I wanted to find like-minded individuals who were looking to push themselves, and the hardest thing to build is community. So when we're able to build this community and we can work together to build a higher self, it's incredible, because the thing is and I talk to people about this a lot is are you with someone or are you having are you talking at them? We need to have those deep conversations because most of the time you ended up spending, let's say, your parents visit or something happens and you spent 48 hours with them Fantastic, right, how much of it was meaningful time? Maybe, like you decide, you decide what meaningful time is and it's based on the questions you ask and it's on the conversations you have that move the needle and change their perspective. It's not hey, can I help out with your laundry today? It's like having a real conversation with people and helping them get to a deeper level.

Speaker 1:

I love that and communities go back literally thousands of years and beyond before if you believe in the Christ and that sort of thing. Before that and what happened during the pandemic and the restrictions of that, we were forced into areas we felt very uncomfortable with and the result of that was finding out that you didn't know your family.

Speaker 1:

You didn't know who your spouses were or your partners, or even your god damn kids. But what's transitioning now is the fact that personal development and the landscape of that is now changing. We're just searching for them. 42% of businesses now offer and this is a statistic of 2022 and that's the most up to date one I could find just off the cuff. I haven't done any research and 42% of businesses actually offer some sort of community for advice, for awareness, for mental health and, like you said, spirituality. But what if we could come? We can combine all of the separate aspects and bring it into one safe space. I'm not talking about AA, I'm not talking about drugs programs or things like that. They're a part of it, because they're also community. But what if you could offer something far greater as an opportunity to bring like-minded people for a movement? What movement would that be for you?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and so that's pretty much what I ended up doing in 2020. I ended up 2020. I was meeting with people one-on-one realizing that they're not getting what they need right, and I realized that if I could get everyone on the same values and the same perspective, then we could meet weekly as a group. It would push their businesses forward. We had one guy who does financial advising. What do you know? Everyone in the group's a client Surprise. It's the frequency effect. You know what?

Speaker 2:

I mean, and it's these things of we're working together and you I'm not saying join my group, I'm not saying join Baz's group.

Speaker 2:

I'm saying have a group that works for you whether you're a member of it and it participating now or not. Hey, I signed up and I'm never gonna go to anything like there are groups popping up everywhere and it's so important connect deeply with people and to understand people, and over the past three years, we've been doing this and it's just been it's just growing and growing. And it's so awesome to have deep conversations. Because I realize that I miss deep conversations and that's why I love the podcast too, because so many people are missing the fact of having deep conversations. Because we have to talk about how was your day today, how was the food you had, have a deep conversation, and so I would challenge the audience to sit there and like with their loved ones, just ask better questions or go deeper with people, and don't do this. I'd ask what's your favorite football team and you say I like the Steelers, and then Jordan pops up and goes I like the Jets. Don't do that. Have a deep conversation and really listen to people.

Speaker 1:

There is a question. There's an entrance question always, but there's also a deeper level question and it's often a why question or a how question. And when it comes to building communities and sustaining these, because if they take effort, they take time. If I'm doing a presentation for anything, I spend along with my team, it's got to come from some ways my ideas, I create the outline and the team does it and actualizes that vision. But it still means spending that time creating the concept, creating what you want at the macro and then coming in at the micro, going. This is how I want it, this is the distinctions, this is the lists, this is the message that I want to convey now in these audiences, in these groups building resilience, building that community and building a repetition of consistency.

Speaker 1:

How difficult was it for you to re-discipline yourself and go? I'm committed to this, like the podcast, because you had a vision you wanted to get in front of people, network congruently and effectively. Is the same thing happened with your community as a whole? Have you found vision? Have you found clarity where you want to get to? What's that next level for?

Speaker 2:

you. Yeah, for me it's been really connecting the people right. So it's having people who don't work together, who don't even in the same field as each other, and having these changing conversations that will allow them to think about the world a little differently. And there's accountability components, there's gratitude components and then, as recently as last year, we started having guest speakers. It's funny because I linked the podcast to it.

Speaker 2:

I have a podcast where I have all of these incredible people come in. This group doesn't know any of those people. I don't know how to connect deeper with these people. Come speak to my group and I started doing that and we've had incredible people come speak and the group loves it, because to me it's funny. For my experience I was like, oh, it's just like another podcast guest. Like these people email me all the time. It's not a big deal, but to them they're like wait, this guy's a millionaire, this guy's done, he sold his business for 40,000?. Who are these people? And I'm like I don't know. Like there's people I talk to, I don't know what to tell you, but it's cool, but you don't realize your assets is what I'm getting at and you don't know how to interconnect your assets.

Speaker 1:

I love that distinction there about assets and also people do not know that they have an asset until it becomes of value to them. It's like having it back in the old days. The property used to be an asset and now it's a liability. So what is the distinction for you of this? Is an asset a relationship, somebody you have a relationship with, and what is a liability in your life? And how do you distinguish the two?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's tough Because, as I've been growing more and more, you start to realize that, like financially, you'll always you can if you know what to do. You'll make the right decisions right If you understand saving more than you spend. If you understand those are easy. What I think becomes difficult is the asset and liability term with relationships, Because you start to sit there and go is this person an asset, is this person a liability? Is this person good for me or bad for me? And it's tough because everyone's a human right. We all have to treat everyone with respect and kindness, but we have to develop boundaries and that's what it's become where it's. Hey, maybe this person's good for me for playing a sport with them, or maybe they're not good to go out with, or maybe they're good for vacation, but not this. Everyone's got their own space, I think. What do you think about that, baz?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think that's very true, because people have a value at one aspect of your life. If you wanna play water polo with somebody, but the other person you wanna play water polo with can't swim, they're in the wrong lane. So you wanna distinguish where they are and how they show up for you. And equally, the relationship has to be mutually beneficial. It can't be saved as a client. You can't expect, you can't give your energy completely to that one person. There has to be healthy boundaries, even in marriages and partnerships and relationships like that. There has to be time where you step away and go. This is my time, this is our time, and we turn off our phones and have a conversation.

Speaker 1:

And many people just go home after a day's work and they sit there in completely different worlds, scrolling, and they go down that tunnel of scrolling. The next thing you know it's three hours later, it's bedtime, the kids have wailing, something's happened, they haven't even interacted and then they wonder why they want someone, wants a divorce, or they wanna separate. It's a lack of communication. If there's no communication, there is no relationship. It's the same with anything.

Speaker 1:

You can have a communication, like you said, with your finances, if you're not saving enough or you're not putting enough away, not as a runny day fund, but being creative and logical about things. And then you wanna go, you pay your electric bill and you find out everything apart from $10 has gone on your bills and you can't pay your electric as a consequence. So it's managing balancing these things, but you can't do that if you can't have the awareness within yourself and be in the right communities to manage what you're doing. You need honest people in your community to say Jordan, wake the fuck up, you're not doing this right, what about this? These honest people will serve you but equally look out for the viability in your life.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yeah, absolutely. And I wanted to just add that cheering on factor and that being understanding of who you are, because part of the time you could tell someone and if a friend quote, unquote a friend, you tell a big win, and they go. They don't go. Oh, that's awesome, keep it up. It's just there's gonna be distance. Yeah, there's gonna be distance. And everyone thinks it's gotta be like this, clean cut. Not at all. No, it's more of a hey, you just develop boundaries. Maybe you text them slower back. Maybe it takes three days to respond instead of 10 seconds, like those are what boundaries are. Maybe you don't answer the phone call, like those are what boundaries.

Speaker 2:

And the other tip I wanted to give to the audience, just in case you wanna develop relationships with anyone, super easy one that I've been doing for the past two years and I hope it picks up a little bit is between that week of Christmas and New Year's I send out voice memos and I've been doing this the past two years and it takes me probably eight, 10 hours and it doesn't sound like that much. But when you're doing literally 10 seconds and they're intentional to each different person, it becomes a process. So I do it over three or four days and it's where I basically send a voice memo and I say hey, whoever name is, hope you're doing incredible. I hope you're having an amazing year and can't wait to hear about all your wins. And I did 750 of these. And the reason I say the number is because it's important to realize how many people you said a nice message to didn't even respond.

Speaker 2:

I go, it's outside of my control. I can't tell you hey, I said a nice thing to you. Respond. Sometimes they don't hear it, sometimes they have so much going on, and that's a way because that week is a very difficult week for a lot of people. Some people have family issues, some people don't wanna spend money on Christmas because they're barely getting by on their own. There's just a lot of variables that week. So I try to be like a beacon of light a little bit where I can, and I'd highly recommend that to anyone. If you wanna connect with someone, quick voice memo, don't even have to call them, and it just says hey, I'm thinking about you and I care about you.

Speaker 1:

I love that and actually she looked at mine. I got mine on the 28th of December from you and it was at 7.18 in the morning my time, yeah, but now I do go back to listen to these messages not just from you, from other people who sent these as well because they're always gonna be there and they're that constant reminder that people actually care and they are thinking will it be only a few minutes a day, but people think about you and you matter.

Speaker 2:

So that brings up a really good point and this helped me a lot along the way. The thing I did was so there's probably moments in your life where someone goes oh Baz, you are incredible, you're amazing, appreciate you, and you get that good feeling inside, right, and this is for the audience. I bet you. There's times where people text you nice things. Maybe it's your birthday, whatever it is.

Speaker 2:

I would screenshot all of these and I put it in a folder of mine called the motivation folder, and it's literally only good things in there. So whenever I'm feeling down, whenever I'm feeling out, there's 80 things in there and they're all just nice things that people say about me. And it might be like Jordan, your content really helped me, or you're doing amazing, or keep up the good work, like whatever it is. It doesn't really matter, but it's just more along the lines. It's a great way, because we are so vulnerable in regard to our emotions, where sometimes we're really sad if a deal falls through or we lose a client, or we're really happy, and you gotta be that even keel. But a good way to do that, I found, is like, when everything's going bad, to read the good stuff, because your brain is a field and it can just grow and you could stack negativity or you could stack positivity.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and that's the choice you have. I love that. Before we part ways today, jordan, is there anything that you would like to leave with the audience called a waction, or some advice you want to give people for anything that's going on in your future?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely First things. First, I would hope that everybody realizes that you are in control of your life and you can create whatever life you want. Second, if you wanna hear more from me, obviously I'm on this podcast. I have my own podcast hashtag clocked in mature networks. I'm gonna be at Baz's incredible event in March and I hope you can find the link below. It's gonna be in the show notes and I can't wait to connect with you guys and just hear your journey and see how I can be of assistance to you guys. And if you guys wanna reach out to me, it'd be pretty much Jordan F Edwards on every social media and I look forward to connecting with everyone.

Speaker 1:

Jordan, thank you very much for your time, energy and love here. It's always a pleasure speaking with you on and off camera. I hope to continue to watch you grow and inspire so many people in your world.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, baz.

Speaker 1:

So, marcel, thank you very much for joining me. As always, it's such a pleasure. Please listen, download if you can, and share. You never know you may change someone's life. Myself, I'm your host, baz Porter. This was Jordan Edwards, and we'll see you on the next episode. Please have a blessed day.

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