Rise From The Ashes

Andrea de Leon's Blueprint for Entrepreneurial Resilience and Success

February 19, 2024 Baz Porter® Season 3 Episode 8
Rise From The Ashes
Andrea de Leon's Blueprint for Entrepreneurial Resilience and Success
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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Discover the transformative journey that Aundrea De Leon took from corporate tech to the realms of hypnotherapy and business coaching. Our latest episode features her remarkable story and the strategies she uses to help entrepreneurs dismantle mental barriers and cultivate success. If you've ever felt trapped by your past or uncertain about your business future, Aundrea's tailored approach and the wisdom she imparts could be the key to unlocking your potential.

Adversity can be a crucible for resilience, and our conversation with Aundrea is a testament to that. She shares insights into how her own challenges, including navigating the foster care system and being unadopted, have shaped her ability to thrive in the face of change. If you're wondering how to harness your life experiences to drive your entrepreneurial spirit forward, this episode sheds light on setting clear intentions, choosing your influences wisely, and using your past as a foundation for growth and success.

Wrapping up, we delve into the personal decision to prioritize happiness over societal expectations and how that choice can lead to both personal fulfillment and professional prosperity. Aundrea's candid discussion about her first tumultuous year as an entrepreneur, the pitfalls she encountered, and the turning point that led to her business's success offers a roadmap for listeners. Her story is not just inspiring—it's a call to action for anyone ready to transform their life and business, and to inspire others to do the same. Join us for this empowering narrative that will leave you eager to take on the world, one intention at a time.

Support the show

Friends, our time together is coming to a close. Before we part ways, I sincerely thank you for joining me on this thought-provoking journey. I aim to provide perspectives and insights that spark self-reflection and positive change.

If any concepts we explored resonated with you, I kindly request that you share this episode with someone who may benefit from its message. And please, reach out anytime - I’m always eager to hear your biggest aspirations, pressing struggles, and lessons learned.

My door is open at my Denver office and digitally via my website. If you want to go deeper and transform confusion into clarity on your quest for purpose, visit http://www.ramsbybaz.com and schedule a coaching session.

This is Baz Porter signing off with immense gratitude. Stay bold, stay faithful, and know that you always have an empathetic ear and wise mind in your corner. Until next time!

Baz Porter:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to another episode of Rise from the Ashes podcast. Once again, it's a privilege to have my next guest here. She is an awesome human being. She lives near me, actually, I met her through a lineable, and a husband appeared on the show a few weeks ago. She is a business owner, she is an entrepreneur, she is the goddess of scheduling things. Her name is Aundrea de Leon and I'm going to let her, as always, introduce themselves. Aundrea, please say hello to the world.

Aundrea De Leon:

Hi, thank you for the introduction, Baz. Yes, my name is Aundrea De Leon , and if I had to tell people who I am and what I do, what I would say is I'm the entrepreneur who helps entrepreneurs and leaders unlock their unique entrepreneurial potential. Coming from actually a human of corporate background, worked in tech for 20 plus years, left that at the end of 2017. 2017 decided to go to this entrepreneurial path that now seems to be like the most popular thing on the planet. Back then, people thought I think people my coworkers and friends I thought were looking at me like a three-headed monster, and now everybody's. I'm going to go be an entrepreneur. So I was doing it before as a bandwagon thing. I did the most logical thing after a corporate career and I decided to go become a certified hypnotherapist, because everybody leaves a six-figure corporate career to go be a certified hypnotherapist. Who doesn't do that?

Aundrea De Leon:

And it was through my journey of trying to figure out this entrepreneur thing, how to replace a corporate career, what it means, lost all my structure and suddenly I'm in this entrepreneurial world and it felt like it was like I don't know. I just call it this whirlwind zone, where it's like there's no rules, there's everything is possible. Too many choices. Everybody's a guru, everybody's smarter than me and everybody's doing it better than me and I'm doing it all wrong. So it was through that path and trials and tributes and trials and errors that actually started building a really I actually started building a pretty successful business. I was hitting pretty consistent $15,000 months, which is pretty uncommon for lowly little hypnotherapist.

Aundrea De Leon:

But I was growing my business and getting pretty successful. People were starting to come to me and go. Other entrepreneurs were like you've been doing this less time than me and you're already more successful than me. What are you doing? And I'm not surprisingly. A lot of my clients were entrepreneurs who had former corporate salaries or former some type of job or career before that. Now I call they had to go work for their commission and get right, make their own money and so a lot of the mindset stuff and mental blocks and things like that. We were working on a lot of money, sales, that kind of stuff. We'd help unlock all their mindset stuff and get them tuned. So they were like ready to go and I'd send them out into their business and their business was a disaster. It was a disaster.

Baz Porter:

It was in the operational wreck.

Aundrea De Leon:

They didn't have clear sales, they didn't have a clear process of delivery, they didn't have clarity of marketing. And so I started putting all these pieces together of just what are the basic steps of business ownership and entrepreneur success. Right, if I can just have just a simple model that I could share with people. And so it was through that that I actually started getting called a coach or being asked to coach, and I never wanted to be a coach. So I'll just say, here I am, five, six, seven years later calling myself a. I never wanted to be a coach. Yeah, I never wanted to be a coach. I fought tooth and nail not to be called a coach and pandemic hit, some things changed and a lot. Just more people kept coming to me and I was like, why don't we just pivot your business this way? Why don't we pivot this way? And I just ended up being in a lot more coaching conversations, both business strategy, sales strategy, language like marketing kind of strategy, and also then, who are resources that I need? Or we're connecting people with resources and tools to be successful. And then it was just, it was like it just happened that way. It just happened that way.

Aundrea De Leon:

I actually did decide to join up. I partner, joined a coaching program, got some. I just got tired of making. I was trying to make videos and workbooks and things like that and I was like, oh my God, that's a lot of work. So I partnered with a coaching program a business coaching program and started working that path.

Aundrea De Leon:

And I found clients are at two paths One, the brand new entrepreneur. The first one year or two year. They're trying to figure out their product market match, how to monetize and how to find a hot market. And those are pretty fun clients.

Aundrea De Leon:

But my favorite clients are the ones that are probably about five to six years in meaning and they're so far down the path they can't go back to a job because they're so far away from it but it's just not going to happen.

Aundrea De Leon:

But they've hit that glass wall where they feel like their business is running their life. They're making money, but not quite the level of money they want to make, but they just don't have any more hours in the day to work. Right, they've got a good product, they've got a good market. We just need to fine tune some things. And so I always say the first thing we have to fine tune is your unique path to success, because they're probably they're usually pulling multiple ideas from multiple groups into their path, and so what we do is what I do is I help them first of all unlock their unique entrepreneurial success footprint, the way that's going to work for them, and then help them then turn around and professionalize that how their business runs, with the right people, the right process, the right tools that literally move them forward into that next chapter of success they're looking for.

Baz Porter:

I love that. I like the uniqueness of what you do and what you said. It's your unique entrepreneurial footprint to success.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yes.

Baz Porter:

And the reason I say that is because success is divine from the individual and it's different from everybody. And, to your point, there is a lot of people who are gurus and say they're self-proclaimed and tell you how to do it in that structure or that frame and it won't work because you're unique to your market and you have a personal message. Yeah, that is gold. For anybody listening to this now going, yeah, ok, whatever, I'm with. So and that's going to make me a million dollars. I will tell you now, will not.

Aundrea De Leon:

I agree with you. I will wholeheartedly agree with you. There might be pieces of it that work great or whatever, but I just watch so many people following somebody else's formula All the meantime, beating themselves up over I'm not doing it right or I'm not good enough, or whatever.

Baz Porter:

And to your point earlier, welcome to imposter syndrome avenue, because we've all walked that path. We're not going to go on through this. I'm not them. And all these limiting beliefs, which aren't ours, come forward especially when we hit entrepreneurship, which leads me into this question. Actually, everybody loves stories of adversity and overcoming challenges. Is there anything in your life that you've overcome that was a challenge that turned out to be a huge opportunity for yourself.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, I can think of about five of them, but probably the biggest one that people think when I tell people or share with us, with people, they think it should have crushed me or how devastating or whatever. And I go wait, no, it was actually the path to freedom in my life and if it hadn't happened, I don't even know how that path would have opened up. And that sure it was. Basically I was homeless and unfamily to teens.

Baz Porter:

So I just don't.

Aundrea De Leon:

There is 2% of the population in America that is officially what I call unadopted, and I fall into that population. So I was adopted at four and I lived with a family. And when I was 12, I went into foster care and by the time I was 14, they had officially unadopted me. They revoked their parental rights and I was awarded the foster care system here in Colorado. And so imagine being a 14-year-old and by then I'd been put through multiple foster homes, group homes, et cetera. I'd run away from multiple of them, ran the streets, all kinds of things, and basically, at 14, this event in my life, this family that I, the only family I had really known as a child, came and said we're setting you free and we're moving in. Best of luck to you.

Aundrea De Leon:

And so here I am, sitting in the backyard of a group home or a foster home, going, ok, I am completely alone in this world. I am completely alone in this world. And then fast forward, people are like, oh my gosh, that's the worst thing ever. And I'm like at the time yeah, it was. And then, in relating to your story of like, why was it the best thing ever in my life, while at the time. I didn't feel like it. Obviously for many years after. It was a lot of work, et cetera. What I realized when I came into my 20s and my 30s and et cetera in life, I started a process early in my life of questioning do I like this, do I want to do this, what do I want to do? It was if you grew up with a family, you grew up in a family culture, you'd have norms. I moved norms every year so nothing was normal. Hell. Sometimes I move norms every other month.

Baz Porter:

How did this destabilize normality? See what's normal.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, this is normal. I'm like I don't even know what's normal anymore. I've seen so many different versions of normal. I don't even know what's normal.

Baz Porter:

Normal was all the glory.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, yeah. So adaptability, all kinds of things so many gifts I got from that in terms of adaptability, flexibility, the ability to deal with change, rapid change not let it rattle me things like that. But I had no clue Like that going into adulthood actually served me so well and served me so well in my career. And then, when I went into entrepreneurship, decided to jump on this entrepreneurship journey. There were so many of those things that served me. There were also so many of those things that I realized I hadn't dealt with, that came up flying in my face and absolutely paralyzed me at moments of time as well. How was that?

Baz Porter:

How did that set you up for? In the resilience for what you're doing now? Did it when you made your part, your upbringing in doing, in taking a foothold in what you're doing now, because people's listened to this entrepreneurial lifestyle is full of uncertainty, pivoting. Do you believe that really set you up the ongoing challenge as a child, through foster care, not knowing, the uncertainty, the denormalization of everything you've ever knew as a child? Did that set you up for success in what you do today? Absolutely.

Aundrea De Leon:

I have the ability today, if something's not working or going right, to sit back and go. Should we keep doing this or should we not? Or to go? I wanna try this out, Like I'm not 100% certain what's gonna happen, but I haven't died yet and nothing's killed me yet, so I think I can pretty much survive anything that happens.

Baz Porter:

That's good, though, and the thing is what I like you. What you were saying now is don't give up, basically because many people in your position not necessarily with your background, certainly because that's unique to you, but many people in your position would have gone. Actually, entrepreneurial shit isn't for me, this isn't what I need in my life, this is too uncertain and I can't. And then the imposter syndrome creeps back in I can't do this, et cetera, and all the lies that your brain tells you previous people have told you that you still believe for many years creeps up on you, but you were aware of that, weren't you?

Aundrea De Leon:

I was very aware. I didn't. I will say I was very aware. I will also say that I am like human and I'm just a normal. I am also a normal human and there were times that caught me off guard and I wasn't prepared.

Aundrea De Leon:

What I didn't, what I did know was I have a power to choose. I either have a power to choose to let it beat me, or I have the power to choose to try and figure it out or learn from it or understand it so that I can find a way to be more directive. Or do you find a tool or a process or an understanding or something? Because things change, everything changes. That is the thing. That's probably the thing I've learned the most is life is change and you're either gonna change with it and grow with it or you're gonna get stuck and things are gonna change. Can either change. Things can either be changed by your choice.

Aundrea De Leon:

I brought your lack of choice and so when those things would come up or would come up, or those challenges, it was two things. I could either blame something or someone or whatever and give up, or I could say how can I be better? What can I do to be better? And if I kept saying, well, what can I do to be better, what can I do to learn and grow? I always made forward progress, and so for me, staying stuck was just there's just not an option. You can't, it's just not a choice. That's the Gearbox divide spirit of Not a choice. I ever choose, and some people do, and that's okay, but for me it was like no, I could choose differently. So what are we gonna do today?

Baz Porter:

Yeah, I love that it's moving through things and making educated choices and Intuitive choices rather than some. I also is a version of what they think you need. Yeah, love that distinction. Yeah, and your trip through normalization. We'll just call it that. Did you pick up any like habits or Rituals that you adhere by, whether it be a morning ritual or something you have to do to set your day up or business up Life? Whatever you want to do for success, but it has to happen. It is a must in your life.

Aundrea De Leon:

Absolutely. I see there's two things. The first one is intention. Without a clear intention, and some people will be like oh, I need goals, I need this and that. To me, goals fit in tensions. So if you don't have a clear intention, it's that's your compass that you can measure all things by and Go in my on track off track, on track off track.

Aundrea De Leon:

Once I learned that and I it was interesting because I actually learned that kind of in my early mid 20s and what it was bad is that I was just getting ready to turn 25 in and yeah, that was like last year, two, three years ago, yes, of course, where I've literally been living by the cuff and, in all honesty, from probably the time I was 18 until maybe my about early 20s. I probably I tell people like I was, I just Probably was looking for the end of my life at the bottom of a bottle and it didn't happen. And so I was getting ready to, I was getting close to turning 25 and I was like, shoot, haven't died yet. I've lived a life most adult oh, dang it, shaky darn. I'd lived a life that most adults hadn't even lived yet, with all the things I'd gone through and changes, and I'd gone through multiple name changes, multiple, everything undoing. I had no sense of normalcy or stability whatsoever. But here I was still going not dead yet and and like capable. There is no reason why I couldn't do things like physically I was capable. Mentally I was able to figure things out. I Actually I had a small circle of friends and some close people that I had chosen to keep in my life and they had chosen to let me stick around, which was really them too and Something happened and I went.

Aundrea De Leon:

If my life is gonna change, I think I need to be intentional about how I want it to change. And I just, I remember just having this thought and I was like what if, instead of being this wild, out of control Drinking person, what if I was a positive, contributing member of society, then what would I do? And that was my first intent, and that was my first intention. And I remember setting that intention and I went Okay, then that's my compass, what's next? And it went well, you get a good job. How do I get a good job? We'll go get an education. So how do I get an education? So everything became an intention, like the goals match the intention right. And it was also then people that I met or actions I undertook. It was always a measurement of does this make me feel like I'm being a positive, contributing member of society and if it's not, I'm off path.

Aundrea De Leon:

And it was interesting because I started that I got moved, put myself through college, changed different people as hanging out with friends, like things just started happening, Met a great guy, got great jobs Like I got jobs in my career that I was pursuing in college, like all kinds of just things just started following up and what I found is that kind of every certain cycle timelines I'd go what's the next intention? The next intention is speak loudly. I'm like all right, what does that mean? I got a side gig speaking for Monstercom and doing these presentations for Monstercom and I got to be a public speaker.

Aundrea De Leon:

So it was just like if I set these clear and set these intentions and said it feels like this, sounds like this, looks like this, as I was setting goals, as long as goals matched the intention, things started happening. And so you and I even chatted and I was like man, I couldn't. Even a month and a half ago, two months ago, I didn't have my next clear intention, so I couldn't even set goals. So I always, every year I don't do annual years like calendar years, I do mind fall around my birthday, which is in the fall, so it always seems a new word of intention seems to come to life and I go great Then for the next year. How do I live that intention? What goals do I set? What people do I hang out with, what experiences do I go on to meet that intention?

Baz Porter:

I love that, and the distinction that I get from that quite simply is choose wisely, because many people in your position would just have an intention at will.

Aundrea De Leon:

Oh, I'll do that today.

Baz Porter:

But you don't. It always falls around your birthday. You're clear about what it is and you're also clear about the time frame it's got to happen in loosely within that 12 month period. Many people can't even establish what they're doing next week, let alone in the next year. So you're about 10 leagues ahead of about 98% of the world right now, which is key, especially when you're stepping forward in an entrepreneurial world and people aspire to be a person, a thing, an object, a desire, the next celebrity, whatever that is. Is there anybody in your life that you can attribute for a role model not that you wanted to be them, but have really guided you as a North Star, for a role model that you can say actually I didn't follow them, but I looked up to them as a leader?

Aundrea De Leon:

That's a good question. I think I've had different people at different phases in my life.

Baz Porter:

It's a memorable one for you.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, I would say the one that had the biggest impact that probably still followed me would be my foster mom. She was my junior high counselor here I was in eighth grade. I know, here I was in eighth grade. She's my junior high counselor and let's just say she got to know me really well because I was in the office in school. So I was visible in all the wrong ways a lot that year and she was always there when things were going on. There was also she long story short she and her husband. Actually, she would take me on weekend trips to go visit her family or babysit kids or then go do activities with.

Aundrea De Leon:

What happened is the group home that I was living in was closing down. I went into her office one day and I said, hey, anybody who would like a really messed up 15-year-old for a couple of years while I emancipate? I just need to get through this so I can get a job and get some things, because I'm done with all this and she's 15. You're already thinking about being independent. Yeah, I'm done with this nonsense.

Aundrea De Leon:

She and her husband got a foster parenting license so that I could go live with them and, gratefully, I had a safe place to land for my high school life. There are a few things that they taught me during that time that still stick with me and have stuck with me. Number one the way that they worked, that I saw a marriage of two people that communicated with each other, or they talked to each other, they collaborated. I don't know if she meant to show me that, but I just respected the way that they disagreed with each other but still kept loving each other and figured it out, and I think it was probably one of the. Obviously we talk about unconditional love or whatever Unconditional love is when you take someone who's not your child into your home and they do wild and crazy things and you don't kick them out. You say I still love you.

Baz Porter:

I know like you right now, but I still love you.

Aundrea De Leon:

I'm gonna like you right now, but I love you right. And the other thing that she taught me she gave me a voice of advocacy for myself. She goes you can choose. Hey, you can choose your name, you can choose how you want the school it was just she just introduced me to this concept of I had choices the first one I'd ever heard this in my life Like you're gonna let me choose. That's dangerous.

Aundrea De Leon:

So there were just some basic things I think that they showed me and taught me. That kind of stayed with me, ongoing throughout periods of life. They definitely as a parent, I looked to them for my role model for parenting, in terms of how calm they were and how patient they were and how it was like family's not it's just not a choice Like your family and it like you're just part of you're here. We've already said yes, we haven't. They didn't officially adopt me, but they adopted me and it was like you're here, you're part of the family. This is what family does.

Aundrea De Leon:

We just do this and so, even being a parent now, there are so many times where I was like I had a good role, a really good role model, and I think the other thing was like my foster dad. He just always was just Mr Calm and steady, and it was he just. It was always about what's the right thing to do. The right thing to do may not be the easiest thing to do, but what's the right thing to do and we can do that, we can get through it. So there were just a few key lessons I think that they taught me, that gave me a kind of a new moral compass that have stuck with me even in adulthood and then on this entrepreneurial kind of adventure.

Baz Porter:

And like these. The reason I do these questions, I have these questions like I present them and they are, is because you're telling a story is unique to you but other people can also relate to. Some may relate to something similar that happened to them. And the success isn't defined by where you've come from or what cars sat in your driveway or what mansion you're living in today. Success is a state of mind, state of being, and there is a statement that in the recent years, that success has to be something of somebody else's stature yeah, A person by your side, a certain caliber of person. You're making six figures, two things. If you're making six figures, that means you're barely making six figures. So if you ever hear someone say I make six figures, they're barely making it nine times out of 10. Not all the time, but nine times out of 10.

Baz Porter:

If they ever say I am an entrepreneur that owns a six to seven figure business, they're in dire strait because they are putting things together in their own minds to contribute or to make up a scenario to make them feel better. And it's done in cars, fast women, materialistic stuff. Don't listen to the BS. Listen to somebody who is authentic and goes this is my journey. I came from hell. I walked through it and stood it and I'd learned a lot. They're the people you need to listen to, I agreed, and some of them are successful, but they're very humble. Equally are some of them are so successful and they're complete assholes. So you can choose which one you listen to, and that's the truth.

Baz Porter:

Failure is often viewed as a negative, but, as you've shared with some of your stories, it's not a negative. How did it make you? How did a fate or failure empower you to drive? To give that drive to yourself for a better life?

Aundrea De Leon:

As I did the things that I thought successful people did right. I got a career, I got married, I bought a house, I had kids, I got two cars. I got all this stuff. And here I am standing. I was successful right let's use the air quotes and I checked the boxes of success Six figuring Were you happy.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, that's the thing, right, I had all the things. And then I sat and I looked around and I went, oh God, why am I so miserable? Why am I so miserable when? At what point do I get to choose to be happy, like I've done the things that said positive, contributing, member of society, right, et cetera. And I said where did happiness go? Because I used to make decisions about my intentions and then they were aligned with happiness and somewhere I got on this track of shoulds and musts kind of thing.

Aundrea De Leon:

You're right, I stood in the middle of this perfect life that I designed so that I could have this great picture life, and I was miserable. And it wasn't miserable because I have a great husband, my kids are fantastic, I live in a great area. It was all internal. And it was all internal and it was like great, at what point do I get to choose happiness? And it was really at that point that it was like, yeah, I've done the counseling and all this other stuff from all the crap, but when do I choose to heal? Because that's different and that's what really started. This whole next chapter was like going on a journey of internal healing my own thoughts, my own feelings, my own beliefs, what are mine versus what have I been handed or adopted or inherited? All of those kind of things you have to go into the internal layers. And so I started that process.

Aundrea De Leon:

And if I hadn't started that process and done some of that internal work of choices and expectations, personal finding happiness within yourself, I remember going through some energy healing kind of scenarios and things like that. And I remember releasing, like, all of this emotional baggage and showing up in places and going. I just like myself, who I am, like I'm not the richest person in the room, I'm not the smartest person in the room, I'm maybe not the thinnest or the prettiest or the whatever, but I really who I am because I like who I show up. I wake up every day and I choose who I'm going to be today. What kind of person am I going to be today? How am I going to interact with people? And I'm glad I did that, because my first year as an entrepreneur, I will I call it my year of failing forward. Everything wrong. Three business coaches in the first six months, minus FD, close to $100,000 investment in programs, things like that made $0 dollars, baz, $0 dollars.

Aundrea De Leon:

Nine months in I'm my.

Baz Porter:

There's a lesson in that, though, and that's these aren't business coaches, they're wannabes. They're business coach. My story been similar things. They don't. They aren't coaching you, they're just taking money. So if you're in this situation, do yourself a favor fire them today.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, I call them their coaches, but they're coaches who take you money and hand you their recipe right. They don't know if it fits you, they don't know if it works for you, they just go great, thanks for your money. Here's my recipe. Go do the work Different. That's not a coach. That's not a coach Like. It's different. So yeah, you know that. So yeah.

Aundrea De Leon:

So nine months in, I'm a failure. I'm $0 dollars. I'm so broke I can't. My family of six at home that's relying on me. I've no idea how I'm feeding them for the next month or two. And I got it.

Aundrea De Leon:

I had been doing this consulting gig with this company. Well, the bank seized them, shut them down. They stiffed me for 40 grand, which was like how I was going to take care of my family for the next quarter. And I'm like, oh God, now I gotta go figure this out. If you can be, you build. We call. I said you asked me how things are going. I'm like what's ups and hiccups? Because it doesn't matter. You can be at the top of the game and life is amazing and you're going to hit hiccups. Things are going to happen.

Aundrea De Leon:

And if people I could tell people there was a period of time where I was like, oh my God, I was at the bottom of the barrel. I wasn't, my brain still worked. I knew how to dial a phone, I had an internet, like I had internet right and I can problem solve. And so you're like, okay, then what do we do next? And so you, just you go.

Aundrea De Leon:

What is the next thing? The next thing is I need to learn how to. I need to learn how to sell. Like I don't have any idea how to collect money right, get it right. And amazingly, a new coach showed up, who wasn't a take your money, give you a recipe. It was a coach who listened to me and said tell me about what you do, tell me about what you're doing, tell me about your experiences in the past, blah, blah, blah, tell me about the this and that. We worked together. And literally in 30 days he had me out networking in a different way and saying things differently. And within 60 days I closed $9,000, when I hadn't closed $900 all year.

Baz Porter:

And.

Aundrea De Leon:

I was like are you kidding me? This is all this is. It's a sales conversation, it's a sales process, and then and so then it was just like then I went oh, now I know what the next help is. I need. If I can sell, I need more people to sell to. I need help with marketing. And so it was just like these building blocks that started happening and I started being more clear about what I didn't know and, instead of letting people sell me and what they thought I needed, I was able to be more clear and say actually, what I need help with right now is so I can invest in that next thing. And every time I made a next investment, I 10 times my ROI in my business and just kept moving forward and forward.

Baz Porter:

And this is what I love about people like you, because you learn through your mistakes.

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah.

Baz Porter:

Many people don't. This is a unique question because I want to know. I want to know, but I am curious. Where do you see yourself in a few months time to a versus a 12 months to three years? What does the new you, the new version of you, want to achieve?

Aundrea De Leon:

Yeah, it's so interesting, baz, because if you had asked me that before, I would have just said I want to be doing this thing like a thing, speaking or workshops or whatever. Actually, the next thing that I want to build, I actually, for the first time ever I always I actually, for the first time ever, I want to build my own team and I actually want to build a company that actually runs and operates, instead of just Andrea doing a bunch of stuff and getting paid for it. Single point of failure. So, over the next 12 months, there's a couple of things that have to happen or that I'm intentionally putting in place to happen. One is a couple new collaborations with some other people who are experts in their space that I can come be an expert for their audience in this building your unique entrepreneurial success. Right, because once people unlock that path, they make amazing choices income unlocks, potential unlocks, et cetera, et cetera. The second thing is teaching other people how to do this and giving them those skills and tools so that we can build a team of people who are doing it. And then, if I had to say, from three years from now, that my company will be more, both an education, a speaking and a training company, and that we have a team of people that are doing those things that I want to serve.

Aundrea De Leon:

I want a million entrepreneurs to be successful in what they're doing, not in a way that it's like, here's my formula, just go blindly do this, but that starts them with. Who are you, what are you best at, what are your strengths, what are your gifts, and how do you design your life to make sure that you get the best of those? Right? Then, if it's, I just want to be a solo partner. Great, you go work with our solar printer team. They'll help you be successful in that. You own a business. You're building a team. Great, we have a path and we have a group of experts that are going to help you build your team and train your team so your business runs back immensely efficient and successful.

Baz Porter:

I love that. Before we go, it's been a pleasure to have you to have you have a conversation with me today. Is there anything that you would like to share with the audience, to send somewhere, if they want to contact you, or if you want to give a freebie away, it's entirely up to you. Just let the world what is your oyster, as they say.

Aundrea De Leon:

The world is my oyster. So the best way to find me is andriadeleoncom. I give people a 30 minute consult when are you, what's your biggest challenge? And I'll help you brainstorm and come up with three action steps you can take to overcome it. And then, if we just have somebody that listens to us and says, great, what did you think you should do, let's play out a couple, three different options clarity. So that's the best way to find me. From there, people go. I've been struggling with this entrepreneur thing. How do I get myself right? Then we can have a conversation and go hey, is this right? Are we a fit to work together? Can I help you? If I can't help you, I'm not your person. I will refer you to someone who can. But if it's something where I go, yeah, I can help you. But I can help you. Unlock your why, unlock your intention. Get clarity of where you need to go next. Usually that changes the course of people's lives. Usually it starts opening doors for us. So that's where we start.

Baz Porter:

Thank you very much for your time. I know it's precious and you're extremely busy. For those people listening now and you're wondering what next, make a choice today. Make a choice for you to elevate not just you yourself, but your business and everybody else around you. Please share this message and inspire someone else's life, your Phoenix voices and your rise from the ashes. Ladies and gentlemen, have a blessed day. Thank you very much for my guest. You're awesome. Until the next time, my friends, I'll see you very soon. Have a blessed day.

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