Rise From The Ashes

Creating A Positive Ripple: Natalie's Contributions to Life Coaching

September 11, 2023 Baz Porter® Season 1 Episode 9
Creating A Positive Ripple: Natalie's Contributions to Life Coaching
Rise From The Ashes
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Rise From The Ashes
Creating A Positive Ripple: Natalie's Contributions to Life Coaching
Sep 11, 2023 Season 1 Episode 9
Baz Porter®

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On this enlightening installment of our podcast, we're joined by the incredible Natalie, a health and life coach who's no stranger to transformation. Once a finance professional and a culinary enthusiast, Natalie's journey to becoming a life coach is nothing short of inspiring. She credits her morning routine, complete with meditation and gratitude journaling, as a crucial part of her self-care regimen and personal growth.

We veer into a compelling discussion about the impact of positive influences and the necessity to purge negativity from our lives. Natalie shares how mentors and a supportive community have been pivotal in her journey while underlining the essence of setting healthy boundaries. She also generously offers a list of valuable resources, including her top picks for books, podcasts, and webinars that have fueled her personal development.

Finally, we delve into the concept of limiting beliefs, a common roadblock on the path to success. Natalie offers a firsthand account of how she overcame her own limiting beliefs and introduces the Lefkoe Process, a powerful technique to identify and reprogram detrimental beliefs. The conversation takes an educational turn as we explore the significance of education reform, the power of journaling and visualization, and the importance of conducting informational interviews. Join us for this enriching conversation with Natalie and learn how she's using her experiences to create a positive ripple effect in the world.

Colorado’s best business coach, Baz Porter, has a new mindset strategy mentoring service to help you unlock new heights of growth, prosperity, happiness, and success. Book your first meeting with the coaching visionary at https://www.ramsbybaz.com/

Support the Show.

Friends, our time together is coming to a close. Before we part ways, I sincerely thank you for joining me on this thought-provoking journey. I aim to provide perspectives and insights that spark self-reflection and positive change.

If any concepts we explored resonated with you, I kindly request that you share this episode with someone who may benefit from its message. And please, reach out anytime - I’m always eager to hear your biggest aspirations, pressing struggles, and lessons learned.

My door is open at my Denver office and digitally via my website. If you want to go deeper and transform confusion into clarity on your quest for purpose, visit http://www.ramsbybaz.com and schedule a coaching session.

This is Baz Porter signing off with immense gratitude. Stay bold, stay faithful, and know that you always have an empathetic ear and wise mind in your corner. Until next time!

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Send us a Text Message.

On this enlightening installment of our podcast, we're joined by the incredible Natalie, a health and life coach who's no stranger to transformation. Once a finance professional and a culinary enthusiast, Natalie's journey to becoming a life coach is nothing short of inspiring. She credits her morning routine, complete with meditation and gratitude journaling, as a crucial part of her self-care regimen and personal growth.

We veer into a compelling discussion about the impact of positive influences and the necessity to purge negativity from our lives. Natalie shares how mentors and a supportive community have been pivotal in her journey while underlining the essence of setting healthy boundaries. She also generously offers a list of valuable resources, including her top picks for books, podcasts, and webinars that have fueled her personal development.

Finally, we delve into the concept of limiting beliefs, a common roadblock on the path to success. Natalie offers a firsthand account of how she overcame her own limiting beliefs and introduces the Lefkoe Process, a powerful technique to identify and reprogram detrimental beliefs. The conversation takes an educational turn as we explore the significance of education reform, the power of journaling and visualization, and the importance of conducting informational interviews. Join us for this enriching conversation with Natalie and learn how she's using her experiences to create a positive ripple effect in the world.

Colorado’s best business coach, Baz Porter, has a new mindset strategy mentoring service to help you unlock new heights of growth, prosperity, happiness, and success. Book your first meeting with the coaching visionary at https://www.ramsbybaz.com/

Support the Show.

Friends, our time together is coming to a close. Before we part ways, I sincerely thank you for joining me on this thought-provoking journey. I aim to provide perspectives and insights that spark self-reflection and positive change.

If any concepts we explored resonated with you, I kindly request that you share this episode with someone who may benefit from its message. And please, reach out anytime - I’m always eager to hear your biggest aspirations, pressing struggles, and lessons learned.

My door is open at my Denver office and digitally via my website. If you want to go deeper and transform confusion into clarity on your quest for purpose, visit http://www.ramsbybaz.com and schedule a coaching session.

This is Baz Porter signing off with immense gratitude. Stay bold, stay faithful, and know that you always have an empathetic ear and wise mind in your corner. Until next time!

Speaker 1:

Ladies and gentlemen, good day wherever you are. Thank you very much for joining me again on another episode of Rise from the Ashes.

Speaker 1:

It's your first time viewing, first time listening Welcome if you're a return viewer, thank you for coming back. These are about your stories. This is a state of platform for you to shine and people to uncover hidden talent. Once that's case is a guest with me at the moment. My name is Natalie and she is an amazing human being with a huge transformational story behind her. So, without further ado, I wanna introduce my next guest, called Natalie. She will do a description of herself and tell the world and you viewers what she does. Welcome, natalie, and thank you for being here. It's a true privilege to be with you today.

Speaker 2:

Thank you guys. It's exciting to be here with you. So, to answer your question, what I am? A light coach who works with busy professional men and women mostly women who are frustrated with their lack of self-care, and I focus with them on physical self-care, mental, emotional and financial self-care. And I find that most people, at least in the United States, are really not focused on self-care because we're busy, busy, busy. We're working, raising children and there is really a lack of self-care. And, having gone through my own personal journey, I feel that this is a really important thing for people to have and to make time for in their life.

Speaker 1:

Tell the audience and the listeners why, how you came into doing this. I know you've got an incredible backstory. How did you go from what you were doing into doing the life coaching thing today?

Speaker 2:

Sure. So I'm actually what I like to call a lifelong learner and I've switched careers. So this is my fourth career. So I'm a strong believer in doing and making changes to whatever you want.

Speaker 2:

So I actually started off with a career in finance. I loved what I did. I was in that for 11 or 12 years, but there was something inside of me that said there's something else you're meant to do. So I ended up leaving, did a brief stint in culinary working in a restaurant was a lot of fun, not what I wanted to do as a career. So I quickly changed that and went into help coaching, did a program in nutrition and health coaching and really got to that journey by my own health issues. So I was working in finance, as I shared with you, and not realizing how much sugar I was having in my diet. I'd go downstairs to the street vendor and buy the biggest banana nut muffin. I'd go downstairs at three o'clock and get the Hershey's candy bar and didn't realize how the sugar was making me sick. And I worked with a mentor who helped me make changes in my life to improve my health. And it dawned on me.

Speaker 2:

I realized hey, this is something I can do to help other people. When I went to college, I never knew about a career in nutrition or health coaching. I just wasn't aware of it, it wasn't on my radar screen, and so, having gone through my own health journey, I realized this is something I wanted to do and make a difference. So I've worked as a health coach for 13 years and after doing that for that length of time, I said, okay, what's my next challenge? What do I want to do differently? And was brainstorming with two separate friends and they said to me oh, we think you'd be great as a life coach, and I wasn't really even sure what a life coach did. So I did some research on that and I said you know, this would be a great transition for me from health coaching into life coaching, because it's really empowering.

Speaker 2:

And life coaching is about empowering the person that you're working with. And it's also empowering for me because I watch them come up with their own answers, their own solutions, and then put that into practice. So they're not being told what to do or you should do this. They come up with all the answers that are really just right in your mind, in your head, and they're just needing to be pulled out. And so that is really how my journey to life coaching came about and really enjoyed all the different things I've done, and I think it's really added to the life coaching that I do. The time that I spent in finance has enabled me to do the financial self-care coaching piece, and I find it's especially important for women. I think women don't grow up with a clear understanding of managing money, investing for retirement or house and budgeting and all of that. They tend to rely on the men in their lives to handle that piece, and so I really like to empower women to understand and gain that knowledge for their own financial self-care and destiny.

Speaker 1:

I love that. Thank you for sharing. So, in short, if you're a female and you're listening to this, there'll be a link in the description. Please click on it and please check Natalie out from the things she's doing and where she's growing to and may possibly help you grow your business or life, so just check that out. When we look at life coaching and coaching in general, what I've discovered in my own journey is people have habits or routines in the morning, in the evening, throughout the day. Is there anything that you can share for the listeners today that may benefit them for your morning routine, or something you've discovered about a habitual practice that really unlocked growth and success for you?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely, and I can't claim credit for it. These have come from other coaches that I've learned from. My morning routine does include some quiet time, usually right after I wake up, and it consists of doing a brief meditation and also a gratitude journal. So I will write down whatever comes to mind, but I'm grateful for it. It could be the orchid plant that I haven't killed in three years. It can be my cat, it could be gaining a new client, it could be an amazing meal that I had the night before. It's just anything that really resonates for you and what you're grateful for, and I find it's important to write it down.

Speaker 2:

I used to be one of those people who would say I don't need to write it down, it's in my head, but there's something about writing it down that makes it more real and permanent. And then the nice thing is that throughout your day, you can go back to that journal and look at and say, oh, this is what I'm grateful for. If you're having a hard day, you're struggling with something, you're upset, going back to what you're grateful for sometimes will help you get rebalanced, refocused. So I'm a big supporter of doing gratitude journals. And then the other piece that I do is my morning routine, is I write down what do I want to be today. So I want to be productive, I want to be happy, or you know it's who do I want to be within myself, my internal mindset, and then also what do I want to do?

Speaker 2:

So I try and write down maybe two to three things that I want to get done. You can have a everybody, I think, has master lists of like what I want to get done this week, my tasks but I like to break it down to just like one or three, one to three things that I can do today. So it's more manageable and not so overwhelming, and sometimes I get them all done and sometimes they don't. I like to check them off. There's something that feels gratifying of saying I finished this task today and sometimes I have to reschedule the tasks for the next day. But again, having it written down really is beneficial. I know a lot of people are on their computers and on their phone and you could do it on your phone as well. Notes, you know whatever works for you, but I'm a strong believer in writing that down.

Speaker 1:

I love that and that's key for anybody's list. This. Now One of the things that I do is before I finish the day and I go leave the office. I work from home. Obviously I will write five things I need to do for tomorrow and I'll sit there in front of me now underneath the computer and one of them's here.

Speaker 1:

But what that does subconsciously, it gets your mind working on them before, while you're sleeping. So before I leave the office, I'll go right this, I need to do this, I need to do this I need to do, and I'll verbally state to myself allow my subconscious to get to work on these while I'm asleep and that frames my next day without me going. Oh, my God, I've got all this to do and if I complete them, I complete them, but at least I know I've got something to aim for and a target goal. So I love what you do there and the meditation everybody who I've interviewed, everybody who I've ever met, has always done a meditation at some point in their daytime, normally first thing in the morning before they get up. Some of the some of the people, like Jodie Spencer, who teach this, will do this every single day and they won't get out of bed until they've become who they are or they want to be for that day. So I love that analogy and how you do that.

Speaker 2:

I know you meditate, we've talked about that.

Speaker 2:

And I would add, I like that you emphasize about doing it in the morning. Although I'm a strong reliever and do it, do it when it works for you and everybody's schedules are different and some people are night owls. I'm not. I'm a morning person. That I have found and I've been meditating for probably 20 years. I grew up in a family that was into meditation and Eastern medicine and they gave me a book on meditation when I was 14 or 15. So, having been a longtime meditator, I would say I find the morning to be best. If I wait till the afternoon or evening and I do a meditation, I find I fall asleep and look, there's nothing wrong with that. Your body needs the rest. It's telling you it needs the rest. But I think if you want to have a meditation to get clarity for the day or have a question that you want to get clear on, the morning time I find is the best for having clarity through the meditation.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love that. There's a whole science on that as well. In the mornings, because of the endorphins and melatonin, you're coming out of sleep sleep state into awake. You're still in tune with the subconscious or superconscious side of you, which is the programmable side of you, and that crossover period, within the first five minutes, if you actually open your eyes, it's the most impressionable. The same as when you go to bed and what you fall asleep listening to is the most impressionable. So there's a whole science and on top of that, what you do with the journaling, what is written becomes a reality.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah. Now I might add there's one other thing I haven't been doing it lately, but I have done it as part of my meditation or right before, and it kind of goes in line with what you've been talking about, baz which is envisioning, okay, what it is I want to create. It's not just what I want to do for the day, but I've talked about I want to be happier, productive, and I envision myself being that way. So I might envision myself going for a walk on the beach, as I live in Florida, and being happy, or or my vision myself working with a new client. You know, it's whatever you want, but, as you said, it's kind of priming the subconscious mind for what it is that you want to create. And then the conscious mind says, oh, okay, this is what you're telling me to do, and create.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's, that's key, and I love what you mentioned that, because many people miss that component and they wonder why things don't happen for them in the timeframe that they expect, because they haven't visualized that, they haven't seen themselves doing it or living that. So I love that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I can't take credit again. I have to give credit to John Astoroff.

Speaker 1:

But these techniques have been around for many, many years, even before John, before you know. Going back to Napoleon Hill and thinking go rich. These have been. These techniques have been around for thousands and thousands of years. They're just being translated in different ways. There's no new material out there, there are just different ways of presenting it.

Speaker 1:

One of the things that I personally do is name source, like you just done. I named where I learned it from, because it's only fair to credit the information and the time and effort built within that person to display it and present it to other people. So I'm a big believer in that. Some of the things that I've done I've invented whole coaching coaching structure, but I've got that from other people and I've put it in my own way and I tell people where it's come from. So it's always important that you credit the people and the sources that came from. If I put a document out and I've used a photograph from somebody on Unsplash, I credit them, give them and link it to them, because you'll get more recognition by doing that. If you've taken a photograph of fine, but credit yourself, if someone else has taken it, use their material, you credit them, give them a lot of acknowledgement. It's fair. It's some AI. Okay, tell it to everybody. This is AI, generating its open source. You have then have permission to use it. It becomes your intellectual property when you actually say or stay intellectual property and you credit them. So it's only fair.

Speaker 1:

One of the things I've noticed within this industry in personal development, leadership, business, no matter where you go in life, we become the most. We become who we hang around with the most five people, most people who hang around with. So it's used about three to five people. Who have you modeled? Who have you hung around with to create what you're creating today? And why do you envision yourself in sort of a year's time with the people you're hanging around with? Who has been the most valuable people you've learned from in your pathway, in your journey?

Speaker 2:

Well, it's been, I'd say, a variety of different people. So the mentor that I had that helped me recognize my health challenges has been somebody that I've worked with who's a strong believer in creating what you want, connecting with source or God whatever you call source and creating what you want. So she's been a mentor of mine for probably 20 years or so, and so I do believe that it is important to have someone that's there to support you. There's always somebody who's maybe two steps or 10 steps ahead of you and can guide you and give you suggestions and feedback. So Deanne has been that mentor for me.

Speaker 2:

I think the other thing that I've created since I moved to Florida about 11 years ago is a like-minded community of other practitioners. So I have a group that I go to once a month. It's not straight networking, it's about connecting, about supporting each other. They call it heart centered networking. So there's a photographer, there's an energy healer, there's a variety of people in this group. We're very much like-minded about helping people and also about using different tools out there to ground us in terms of our practice and who we want to be and what we want to give to the community and to the world.

Speaker 1:

And.

Speaker 2:

I think that's made a huge difference in feeling supported and also supporting other people with my coaching and helping them process things. So I think that finding your community of like-minded practitioners is important. I know you asked me about the positive people that have had an influence and I do want to take a moment just to kind of talk just briefly about the importance of releasing and letting go of negativity or negative people in the environment.

Speaker 2:

I think we've all had that experience. I've had people or friends that were just negative, that were draining, that I had to let go walk away from, and that's part of what I do with my coaching in terms of self-care and what I call creating healthy boundaries.

Speaker 2:

So there are times when we do have to say goodbye to somebody that's not positive and uplifting in our lives so we can be surrounded by those that do support us, that do love us and that are going to help us grow on our journey, and so I think people have a hard time with doing that and it's important to know it's okay to do that nicely, gently, but you do want to surround yourself with like-minded, positive people.

Speaker 1:

I like that as well, and it's important that you mentioned that. When people become comfortable in masterminds and situations, sometimes they get roped into environments that they feel uncomfortable with and don't agree with. Having the awareness that you're in charge but it's your journey, not someone else's and allowing yourself and giving yourself permission to let go of people that are no longer serving you including coaches, including mentors, family, friends that don't resonate with you or they don't vibe with you anymore the sooner you let go of something, you close the door, but another one will open for you.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely yeah, and I've seen that as I shared with you changing my careers. Every time I said, okay, I'm done and I'm leaving, and I didn't always have another job lined up, it was okay. The next door opened and new people came in. The opportunities arose.

Speaker 1:

And it's important to remember that people are getting so afraid and caught up with. Oh, I can't let go of that, whatever that is, because it becomes uncomfortable with the uncertainty of the unknown. But that's where growth happens and I love the way you presented that. And even to master mine. I'm not the only one doing this. I've walked into rooms and gone. I'm in the wrong room and every room that I walk into on that caliber, I want to be the person that doesn't know anything.

Speaker 1:

I want to be the person that learns from everybody and these are billionaires, millionaires, very successful CEOs, because I want to learn their strategies, because they made it to. You know Ubersuccess, 10 figures and above.

Speaker 1:

I want to know that I know how to do the six figure and the seven figure, but I don't know yet how to do the eight and nine and 10. So I will hang around with Ubersuccessful people to learn that skill and master that skill and then put it on so I can be them people 10, 20 years in the future. It doesn't happen overnight, but in order to do that I must leave the rooms that don't work for me.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

And it's important to remember that, and also in this fast paced sort of industry and personal development, we always learn. We're always growing with different avenues. Can you recommend any books not a podcast or even other resources that you listen to, learn from and could possibly give impact to somebody else from the understanding in their field or what you've done?

Speaker 2:

Well, in terms of people, I would say it's been a combination. I mentioned John Asseroff and he has a website with lots of videos and resources on there that people can go look at and download. I've also used, as I shared, meditation, so I learned to meditate with Spirit Rock Center for meditation, tara Brock which has a great website with lots of meditations everywhere two minutes to an hour and also Dharma Talks. So she's another one is a resource that I really like and listen to.

Speaker 1:

Again, I will put all the links in below, because I think it's important that people get access to them and they don't have to go searching for them.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mentioned these and another person I really like and I've taken some of her workshops is Mary Morrissey, and she has tons of resources on her website and does lots of webinars throughout the year as well. If you want to work on up-leveling your life, she's another one that I've really been impacted by.

Speaker 1:

Awesome. As I said, I'll put them links below so you can just check them out for your free will. Sometimes failure is viewed as a negative in the world. Can you share with the audience something that you have a perceived failure of, but you've actually it's been an asset to you and you've grown from it?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely so. When I first started doing my health coaching and I wanted to work for myself, I would say that I struggled with it. I did and I ended up stopping and going to work for two different companies doing health coaching. And it made me really take a look at my mindset and stop and say, ok, why is this challenging? Why am I not attracting in clients, where am I at this point in my life? And it made me take a really good look at myself and my mindset and I believe, because I've seen it for myself, that some of us not all of us.

Speaker 2:

But some of us grow up with limiting beliefs from childhood and if we don't recognize the limiting beliefs and process them and let them go and replace them with new beliefs, then they can keep popping up, even if you're in your 30s, 40s or 50s. And I had this limiting belief of I'm not good enough Because as a child I was told, and they told my parents I should not be very good at athletics. You really can't do that. And I wanted to take advanced French classes in middle school, which isn't typically offered in the United States. They start languages in high school. And the French teacher told my mom well, we don't think she can do it, but we'll let her try.

Speaker 2:

So I kept hearing all throughout childhood, things that made me feel I'm not good enough, I can't do this. And now I look back and I say, well, I became fluent in French, lived with a family in France for a month, but I was 16. I'm super athletic. I play tennis, I kayak, I paddle board, I do yoga, so I've overcome all of these things. But I realized I was still holding on to that belief of I'm not good enough, and so when I went to launch my health coaching business years ago. It didn't go up, didn't take off. So that's, I would say, was a failure that I had to work through and really process and see that I was still carrying some of those beliefs in my head, even though I had overcome them and was happy with who I am and who I was, and what I was able to do was still carrying those beliefs around.

Speaker 1:

When you look at them beliefs now, do you have an understanding of why they happened and how now you can easily overcome them by redirecting yourself?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely. So I spent some time studying the lefko process.

Speaker 1:

It's a.

Speaker 2:

LAF KOE and he talks about the fact that these beliefs are created in childhood, usually in experiences with a parent but it could be not a parent as well and we make, we create a story about it and we give it meaning, and so it's looking at that story and then saying, well, ok, that story was one possibility. But another possibility is that the teachers just didn't know how to help you or work with you on a kickball or whatever the gym class was, or the teachers didn't have enough time to work with you because they had so many students. So it wasn't that you weren't good enough, it's that there were other things going on. So we really dig down to the story and understanding that there was other possibilities and that you never saw. You're not good enough.

Speaker 2:

I never saw because you can't see, you're not good enough, so it's something we created in our head. And so if you can't see something, how can it be true? And so I'm glad you're grinning too, because the first time I did that I said yeah, it's. You can't see this. We make assumptions, we read into things, we see people's faces and we think, oh, they don't like me or they're thinking badly about me. But we didn't really see anything happen. We made a story up in our head.

Speaker 1:

And it's that story that we reaffirmed time and time and time again, to make it our belief. And then it becomes our reality. If there's an unbop prox to go, the late-bop prox goes into this and what his teachings are, and they come from Napoleon Hill and many, many people in between there. If you can establish a link between a belief and then understand how it got seated in there, then you can unpick it, reverse the process. You can then, over a period of time and repetitive, sayings and affirmations how we want to do this.

Speaker 2:

Reinforcement yeah.

Speaker 1:

Reinforcement. You can then create a new belief and new identity from it. But I love what you said. You wanna know how. What it is first, the exact thing. And to your point, it's usually installed in you because you're a computer programmer. That's what your brain is Between the when you were born, sometimes even before that, if it's from the RNA or DNA, and also up until seven years old. You're impressionable. Yeah, that's the average. This is always up for debate. This is the latest science on it. There's always somebody else coming out go?

Speaker 2:

no, it's not that. But, you can email.

Speaker 1:

Email me later. So I love the way you've gone backwards and identified what it is, understood it and then unpicked it to reinstall another habit. Some people take years to do that. You've done it in half the time because you recognized where it's come from through the studies you've done in various places.

Speaker 2:

And that's something I've done with clients.

Speaker 2:

It's easier when you're sometimes to see it in other people than yourself, and I'll be coaching and I'll hear it come up and I'll say to them do you realize you're walking around with belief of X, Y, Z, and then the light bulb goes off and they're like, yeah, and so then we talk about where does this come from?

Speaker 2:

I had a client who grew up with the I'm not worthy as well, because she was born out to a mother out of wedlock, and this was what she grew up feeling not worthy and what she was told. And she's still carrying it around. So we recognized it, we released it and then I focused her on recognizing she is worthy. So she would come back and say to me oh, I worked on a client today and they were so thankful and they gave me an extra tip and all that. And I'd say to her do you see that this is your worthiness being reflected back to you? People love your work, they love who you are, and so now you have to be ready to receive it and open to I'm worthy because you are.

Speaker 2:

And people are reflecting it back to you. But until you release the I'm not worthy, a lot of people get stuck and they don't see it or feel the positive I am worthy.

Speaker 1:

And you just have to have very poignant and key there to unlocking it so much more. The word feel yeah. You must feel it, then it becomes a belief. Some people just say, oh, you've got to do it, but it's going to become a part for you. You've got to go from one identity to another and then the universe, your energy, science behind it not going to go into it will open that up in order for you to live that reality.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely it's amazing that you've managed to do that and you can now teach it to other people. People have a concept of it and they don't know really how to explain it or teach it to others. You've not only done it, but you've actually applied it and you're a result of what you've done, so you can then teach it. So that's a hell of an achievement for somebody who has identified the beliefs, come through layer after layer after layer and recognizes even more what to do, but come through it again. So thank you very much for doing that and showing up for your clients and for the world the way you do.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely, thank you. I've struggled with it so I can relate to how people must feel.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and that's key. You say you struggle, but you've overcome it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

The challenge has been done, set and you've gone. Game of tennis and you've gone into it. So that's important to remember that. Looking forward to the future because we always like to look forward into something or vision what do you see yourself in in three to five years time? What do you want to be doing?

Speaker 2:

Well, I see myself as continuing to do the life coaching and to be able to reach more people through the coaching as my main focus. I, over the years, have worked on mentoring high school students through a program where I live, and so I'd like to also devote my time to doing some more mentoring and support of young girls and boys that are coming up in the world. I think there's still a need for that gap between finishing high school and going off either to college or trade school or what how do we start my life? And so I think it's important to help them there.

Speaker 1:

I like that. I think it's important that we start teaching people the the next generation entrepreneurial skills, because I truly believe that entrepreneurs will change the world. You know, if you look at the old format of education, it hasn't changed for 400 years plus. They're still sitting rows, they still do the same thing, they still algebra, etc. Etc. And, yes, universe, the way the world works is mathematics. But equally, if we don't change with the times, we're still stuck in the stone ages and we're still living a primal instinct as a repeat subconscious program. So in order to break that and break through it and overcome it, education needs to be reformed. And then how we show up in other people's lives. So I love the fact that you're showing up for the kids who are in that transitional period of hi.

Speaker 1:

I've left school, I'm a high school student. Do I do college? Do I do university? What am I doing? What the hell's this? I better pay my bills and I got no idea how to do it, because that's where they're impressionable. So if you can make a positive impression of leadership, teaching the right skills within your industry and within what you're, in the scope of what you're doing, that's going to change our future. So I love. I love that what you mentioned something earlier to me about having a positive mindset and knowing what you want. What valuable lesson did you did you learn for from going, not knowing what the hell you're going to do for the rest of your life, from playing tennis doing what you're doing, showing it for clients, blah, blah, blah, blah. What? What is the one thing that you can share, that has a vision for you personally, that you adapt and teach to other people?

Speaker 2:

I think it's that you have to get clear on what you want as a first step, and a lot of people I talked to will say, well, I'm not happy with where I'm at or my job, but they don't really know what it is that they want to create. So I think the first step is really getting clear on what it is you want to create and then knowing that you can. You can do that and, just as we talked about earlier, letting go of the fears, the challenges, the barriers, and recognizing you know, yes, you can do that. So I think getting clarity first is getting clarity on what you really want.

Speaker 1:

So if you were to give actionable advice now to somebody and you're not coaching me but using as an example what would you tell somebody to start doing? You said journaling visualization. Is there a neverlayer you could go go with to help somebody not really tune into what they want?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I would say to, to write down, and it could be scrap use of paper, it doesn't have to be a journal. The questions, the answers, excuse me, to the questions of what makes me happy in life, what, what interests me it could be an interest you had growing up or, you know, in your teens and just keep writing down what makes me happy, what interests me, and asking yourself the question what would I like to do for the next part of my life? And even if you don't have an answer today, what I found is when I ask people that question, it plans to seed in their head and usually within the next day to a week they'll say, oh, all of a sudden, this idea popped into my head, the answer to the questions that you asked me. So it's okay to say right now I don't know, but by just thinking about that question, you're planting that seed in your mind and in the universe to say, okay, what is it? My next step, what is it that I want to do? And so it might, since some people might sound silly or oh, I don't have an answer, but just do, just do it, just do the exercise and see what comes up. It might not come up in a day, but I'm sure within a week you're going to have some ideas pop into your head. You could be random times, you could be at the gym or having dinner and all of a sudden an idea will pop into your head oh, I used to love piano, but I don't play piano anymore, or you know whatever it is.

Speaker 2:

So I like people just to take two or three questions of you. Know what makes me happy, what is it that I used to enjoy doing, and what do I want to do for the next chapter of my life, and then just keep focusing on it, because I do believe the answers will come. And the other piece I would say is to talk to more people about it. That question and I've always done informational interviews with people what do you love about your job? What do you hate about your job? How did you get into this? And most people are generous with their time and most people like to talk about themselves. So if you ask somebody to give you some of their time, they're going to say yes and that might help you grow on your journey. If you're thinking, oh, I might want to get involved in XYZ, go talk to somebody who does it and they'll. They'll share with you yeah, I love that.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for the advice for for today do you have? Anything to add before we wrap this up? Nassity?

Speaker 2:

Oh, I just want to say thank you for today.

Speaker 1:

I've enjoyed our conversation again, thank you it's about people like you showing up and doing what you do to change the world, and I said why this platform's here? So thank you very much for showing up. It's been a privilege to be with you today. Ladies and gentlemen, if you like it, please share it, and it's going to help somebody else and share it for you. Pay it forward. It's about coming together as a collaborative unit and changing other people's lives. Natalie has done it, so can you. For myself, I'm Bass Porter. Thank you for being here, thank you for showing up, and I'll speak to you very, very soon on our next episode, which will be next week on Monday at the same time For myself and Natalie. Have a blessed day.

Life Coaching for Self-Care and Success
Positive Influences and Letting Go
The Power of Overcoming Limiting Beliefs
Education Reform and Career Clarity

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