Rise From The Ashes

Jordan Edwards: A Journey Through Marathons and Life

July 17, 2023 Baz Porter® Season 1 Episode 6
Rise From The Ashes
Jordan Edwards: A Journey Through Marathons and Life
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Have you ever wondered how a man who had never run more than five miles in his life, could triumph two adrenaline-pumping marathons, all whilst raising funds for the colorectal cancer alliance CCA? Meet our guest, Jordan Edwards - an accomplished podcaster, committed family man, and inspired coach. Jordan unfolds his awe-inspiring journey of setting audacious goals and then achieving them, by adopting a disciplined routine and maintaining a holistic perspective on life. He emphasizes how having role models can fuel your dreams and how a supportive network can help you maneuver through life's toughest challenges.

Settle in as we dive deeper into Jordan's life, his disciplined routines, and how his strong network keeps him motivated. You'll not just hear about his dedication and goal-setting strategies but also witness the power of persistence and resilience in the face of adversity. We share our thoughts on how rejection could be a stepping stone for success and how gratitude can illuminate even the darkest corners of our lives. We recount our experiences, the impactful lessons we learned, and the people who have left an indelible mark on our journey.

As the conversation unfolds, Jordan reveals his future plans - from growing his coaching group to continuing his podcasting journey, and even traveling, he has his sights set on an exciting future. He exemplifies his commitment to the community by expressing the importance of giving back. We wrap up our conversation by challenging you, our listeners, to express your appreciation to three people who have made a difference in your life. This episode is more than just a conversation; it's an enriching dialogue with valuable life lessons and inspiring insights from Jordan's journey.

Support the show

Friends, our time together is coming to a close. Before we part ways, I sincerely thank you for joining me on this thought-provoking journey. I aim to provide perspectives and insights that spark self-reflection and positive change.

If any concepts we explored resonated with you, I kindly request that you share this episode with someone who may benefit from its message. And please, reach out anytime - I’m always eager to hear your biggest aspirations, pressing struggles, and lessons learned.

My door is open at my Denver office and digitally via my website. If you want to go deeper and transform confusion into clarity on your quest for purpose, visit http://www.ramsbybaz.com and schedule a coaching session.

This is Baz Porter signing off with immense gratitude. Stay bold, stay faithful, and know that you always have an empathetic ear and wise mind in your corner. Until next time!

Baz Porter:

Good afternoon, good morning, good day wherever you are in the world. Welcome again to another episode of Rise from the Ashes. Today I have the fabulous guest called Jordan Edwards. I've known him for a while he's an awesome human being, does a lot. I'm going to let him explain it, but before I do that, I'm going to go to this and we're back. Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce this awesome human being, Jordan Edwards. He is a podcaster, he is a family man and he does all sorts of coaching, mastermining stuff. Ladies and gentlemen, I'm going to let Jordan introduce himself for what he does and who he is. Jordan, please, the floor is yours.

Jordan Edwards:

Absolutely, Baz. Thank you for having me first off. Thank you, I'm very excited to be on the podcast and, yeah, I'm Jordan Edwards. I do a few different things. I've run the hashtag Clockton podcast, which is a top 1.5% podcast in the world, interviewing people like the founder of Reebok, David Meltzer, Bradley and everyone Baz has been on there and everyone in between, and it's led me on quite a journey. It's this idea of getting a holistic perspective that we're really all looking for and, yeah, I do some coaching, I do group work. I do a bunch of different activities. I've traveled 25 countries, ran two marathons and, yeah, it's just. I find life to be very there's tons of opportunity here and a lot of us only see it through one perspective. So my goal is to help people see many different ideas and what could work and what could make you happy.

Baz Porter:

So you mentioned marathon there. What possessed you to run one marathon, let alone two?

Jordan Edwards:

It was 2019. I was. It was the year coming into 2019 and I'm sitting there and I set a. It was a new year's resolution. Everyone does this new year's resolution. So I'm like what nonsense? Like what do I need to fix? I don't need to fix anything. I need a new year's goal. I need a new year's direction, I need guidance, like I need something to happen. So I set three goals for myself. One was to run a marathon noting I've never ran more than five miles at that point in my life. One was to start a business and the last one was to pass all four sections of the CPA, which is an accounting exam. The CPA I did not pass and I share that because it's okay to fail, like it's okay to fail and that's part of the process. But the business I started, edwards Consulting you see me I'm rocking the shirt, still doing that to this day and the marathon ended up being a journey of. The funny thing is everyone thinks the marathon is it. It's never the marathon, it's the four AM wake up calls, when you're running 10 miles before work that day, or 15 miles, or 20 miles, or you didn't go out Friday night because you, with your friends, because you got to wake up so early, because you're in Florida and I ended up running the Lake Tahoe marathon, which that's 6,000 feet elevation and it's just, I'm at zero. I literally live at zero elevation. So it was a challenge. I'm running around with a mask. I look like a lunatic, but it was. I just knew, to have an exciting life, you had to the physical component had to be there. So how to push myself physically in these different directions?

Baz Porter:

I love that I can relate to the, the, the, the elevation, because I was living in LA and now I live up in the mountains at just under five, just under just under six, five something I don't know, but I can relate to that and it took me a while to adjust to the elevation here and we went straight into the winter here in October last year, so it was interesting. Now some of our listeners are fascinated with stories of sort of overcoming adversity. Can you share a time where you actually faced adversity or a challenge that you deemed then as to be a challenge but overcome to a success, or what you deem as to that stage of success in your life?

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, absolutely. So I'll bring it to the second marathon. It was because you asked why was there two marathon? But it's like I the second marathon. So Lake Tahoe was a thousand people, which is not a big marathon. It was everyone's running the space out. So I had a buddy who reached out to me and he was uh, he was running the New York City marathon and I have these pillars with Edwards Consulting, and there's five pillars. It's mental health, physical health, community service, philanthropy, spirituality and relationships, and the idea is, if we can together in one activity, we can live a more exciting life. So when my buddy reached out to me, it was for the New York City marathon. It was raising money for colorectal cancer alliance CCA. You got to raise $4,000 for each participant and there's two slots. So I go all right, let's see how we can make this happen. So it was me. I've never raised money, by the way, before that and this was like three or four months before the race. We're not fully trained. So it's me, and then my brother hops into this and he's never ran before in his life, like he never ran a marathon at all. He never ran more than six miles. Um, and it was us too, and we had to raise all of this money while training, while living our regular lives, and it was challenging. There were points where I didn't want to. First of all, who wants to run 20 miles and then get on a call with someone being like, hey, can you please donate a little bit? Like trying to raise money for this. So I got. I had to get creative, I had to figure out ways to make this happen. So I knew I had the podcast as a platform. So I reached out to the colon cancer alliance. I reached out to their president and said, hey, I'm running on your team. Can I interview you? Because I don't even know what colon cancer is at this point? So you're trying to raise money for something that you don't know about, because you want to do an activity that's really impactful with your family. And so I did the interview. It was incredible and what it did was it gave me a way to give awareness, not in a beggy way. So I was able to put this on different platforms, send the audio around, and we were able to raise money and we saw it happening. And it was an incredible process of like 200 here, 500 here, a thousand here, and it just it was a very eye opening experience for myself because at that age that was two years ago, so I was 25 and philanthropy is not a big thing Like it is. It is really centralized around like, hey, you have money or you want to donate at the shelter, and it's such a challenge. I see you like not bad, because you know, it's true, philanthropy is missed and I was like, if I want to live an exceptional life, I have to get as many of these pillars going and me donating 100, 200 bucks to my organization. That will help. But this is really proving to myself that, hey, we can make this happen. And it was cool because it was me and my brother. It was 4,000 a person but we just said, hey, screw it, we're pushing it together, we're making it 8,000. So you start raising more money, you start getting more incentivized, more people are on the mission, more people are excited about it. And it was just an incredible journey of running one of the most iconic races in the world, because the New York City it was the 50th year the New York City marathon is not open at all unless you are raising money or you are incredibly quick, which I am not incredibly quick.

Baz Porter:

So not yet.

Jordan Edwards:

Takes time, but yes, it was. It was just an incredible journey, but it was. The things that people don't realize are the 4am wakeups. They don't realize the adversity that we have to go through when I'm telling everyone hey, I actually got to get up at 4am because I have an 8am meeting and I got to have my three hour run beforehand. Like, you sound like a lunatic, but that's what it takes. That's what it takes to get to the next level sometimes. Sometimes you've got to jump, sometimes you've got to push yourself into the deep end and I know, bad, bad, you've done that. You do that regularly Little bit, yeah, it's.

Baz Porter:

I like what you're saying. It's the things that people don't see that make the difference. As someone once told me, every major success in the world is 15 years on average, in the making. So all these people who you see on TV the philanthropists, the public figures they didn't get there because they're lazy. They got there because they faced the adversity and they started to build, like you did, jordan community around what you wanted to achieve, which is key into any success. You can't do it on your own, which brings me to my next question Successful individuals. They often have daily routines and daily habits. Now, you mentioned getting up at 4am for that marathon. What did you do then at 4am is your routine? I know you've got to go on a three hour run. Sometimes you're completely insane and I get it, but what do you do now as a routine? What can you give advice Can you give that person who is going or want to do a marathon, or want to level up and be the expert Notice, I said the expert in their field, not an expert. There's a difference, but there's a routine around it. What's yours? Yeah, that's a great question For me.

Jordan Edwards:

The best time I had a routine was when I was doing 75 hard. That was back in 2020, because have you heard of 75 hard? So it's the two workouts a day.

Baz Porter:

It's the reading.

Jordan Edwards:

It's the drinking gallon of water, no alcohol, clean eating. And what would I optimally try to do? And I want to know this is the optimal routine. It's not every day. You set the alarm at 5.30, you get up, you work out. For me it's always working out reading, going on a walk, getting outside, getting that light exposure and, like I said, it's multiple activities. So how do I do that? I'm not getting up alone, it's me and my girlfriend getting up. It's me and my girlfriend going to the gym together. It's me and my girlfriend going on that walk afterwards together. It's us eating breakfast together because we're going to be on the same team. We're going to be on the same team together because the thing is, I see a lot of relationships where it's like one of the persons super dedicated and one of the persons just like trying to make it happen, and I feel that alignment helps a lot. You might go to the gym and express a few words together, but it's like, hey, we won the battle together. And winning these mornings, I think, is so important because when you don't, it causes you to feel slow, you feel lethargic and you're like, oh, am I ready for the day, am I ready for this, Because it can be intimidating and it doesn't have to be this whole cold shower, do 100 different things, it's just whatever it is for you that gets you up. I think it's key to get outside, and it can even be a walk. I did like this morning, I did a walk outside and I had breakfast with my girlfriend, but you have to make it something special.

Baz Porter:

Yeah, no, I agree completely. What did you do when you started? How did you reinforce that, reinforce the habits you started to build?

Jordan Edwards:

So the way I did it is and this is interesting because it's for me it can be very difficult to have a habit without an ending. Because I realized this with the marathon you do the marathon, you're running, you're doing all this good stuff, you're waking up early, you're doing these things, marathon, and you're like, oh sick, let's chill. And you're like, have it gone? 75 hard, same thing, have it gone? So now for this year 2023, I set the habit of working out 300 times. This year I might go 300 times. That's a lot. How does that even work? Because I realized that if you set goals over a longer duration of time, like Tony says, we overestimate what we can do in a year and we underestimate what we can do a decade. So if we set ourselves up with, hey, I'm going to do 300 workouts this year and if you see me on my Instagram, it is there every single time I post my workout I'm like workout 225. That was this morning. Workout 225 of 2023. And I know I'm going to get past 300, but it was just a goal set for myself, because it's I find in life we get very complacent Very quickly and it happens with all of us. It was July 4th weekend and we're meeting the day before. Many people are taking off. Many people aren't open to the challenge. Beth, how do you maintain a routine? You seem stinging, you seem on it. How do you do it Discipline?

Baz Porter:

I realized very early in my personal development, career and then teaching this stuff, that 99% of what we do is discipline. 1% is that goal. So you can set the goal, but then you need a pathway to get there. Yeah, on top of that you need to discipline within yourself to go. I'm getting up what you do in the morning, jordan, get up half past five, go on the walk, do the thing that inspires other people. But then what you're doing is also on top of that, you're leveraging your network, social media etc. To inspire you to do more. Because I'm sure on your social media, on Instagram I'm not on Instagram, I've come off everything other than LinkedIn because that's where my clientele are but the feedback you get on LinkedIn is amazing. Sorry, the feedback you get on Instagram is amazing because people will say I like that, I find that inspiring. So you build in the community around it and also you're getting recognition from others to inspire other people. The goal isn't just the goal, it's having the discipline within yourself to get up to do the diet, to do the thing that is uncomfortable in that growth zone. Someone actually taught me a while ago is that if someone is losing weight, don't class it as a loss, Class it as you're gaining three pounds or 10 pounds of lightness. So you're reframing the language around it and it works. The discipline is key. So that's what I found with my own routines and getting up in there. But also, if you do it long enough to your point, it takes 21 days to build a habit. Approximately it takes 90 days to build a lifestyle. But above that, it takes discipline to continue with it, to motivate yourself to go and do it. Now the inspiration and motivation are two different things and I'm not really going to the do's and don'ts of all that. But the inspiration you need. You already have. You don't need the motivation, because the motivation is the goal, but to achieve it you need a discipline to get to do it.

Jordan Edwards:

I love that. I love that, yeah, because it doesn't just happen. It takes a lot of intentionality and a lot of yeah.

Baz Porter:

It's good, because that brings this to another level. They commonly say we're the five people we hang around with. Who inspired you to do what you're doing today. Was there a particular person, a role model that you had, or was there a group of people, and would you mind sharing about that?

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, absolutely so. For me, it was interesting. That quote resonates so much for me because when I was doing one-on-one coaching and I still do it today I was doing one-on-one, but it was very ad hoc, where I would meet with people. They would cancel, reschedule, just the challenges, and so what I ended up doing was actually Neil Gupta, who we both know. He was like Jordan check out my group coaching, look at it. Just, you're not gonna charge, I just want you to see what it works like. So I did that, and that was in 2020. And the incredible thing was I started the group coaching like that next month. People fall off, people come in, whatever it is. But oh my god, I did that and that changed everything, because for me, we meet on Monday night and it's something that's very, very powerful For me as the leader of it, but it's also powerful for each of the people, because we all get new perspectives and we all have these deep conversations. That found myself struggling For that concept of the deep conversations. So it started off as that. Then it started. Then it kind of led into the podcast as well. Why am I doing the podcast? Because the podcast allows me to have the conversations to In a very interesting way, because, if you think about it, you might have a friend or you might meet, or you might have meetings and all this. There's always an objective, there's always a thing we want to get done. There's very few times where it's hey, I really want to just help you, like we all just want to help each other, and there's there's mastermind. There's different areas for this to occur. However, it is something that can change our perspective 180 degrees, like when I joined I was, it was unblinded. When I joined unblinded it was. It was crazy. You start seeing people that are doing levels and levels and you're talking about platinum partner, levels and levels and you're like, wow, some of these guys are and these girls are just rushing life, yeah. And you sit there and you're like, first of all, how are they able to take off, I don't know, a month a year to travel to all these events that afford it all? Then do it and you just put it all in perspective. You're like, wow that is incredible. There's got to be something right about that formula and they're always looking and they're always growing. So it's finding those people. And then it was. Another great quote that I had was, or I heard recently, is about mentorship. Most people want to formalize a mentor. They want to go. That's what you be my mentor and it's like no, like, that's my coach. You guys might help you. Or, if you have a challenging situation, go back. What do you think? How would you handle that? And that can be over an email, that could be a voice memo, it can be whatever. And that can be an informal mentorship, because what I realized was through the podcast that allowed me to get to higher level people and what I would do with that is never be like Baz. I need an hour and a half of your time just to discuss and, knowing Baz, he's a good guy, so he'll be like Jordan. What are we discussing? What's gonna happen? How are we gonna do this? It's more of a. It's gotta be a win-win situation for everyone and through that it allows for more prosperity and it allows people to look at you in a different way, because you have a value at Instead of just a take-take environment.

Baz Porter:

I like what you just said. Then it's about having the exchange, which is equal. Podcasts are an amazing way. I know you have an extremely successful podcast. I've been on it we mentioned earlier and you've introduced some incredible people around the world who are, you know, umber successful. I want to credit, you know, sean Callaghy and the Unblided Crew for doing what they do and what they teach in their dimensions of coaching and event management. But without them you wouldn't be here and I certainly wouldn't be at the level that I am of integral-based influence, and it's interesting that you have these perspectives. Who is the one particular person that you kind of look up to as a not so much as a mentor, but as someone you would aspire to be?

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, so it was interesting Because Sean brought up a Sean Callaghy. He brought up an incredible perspective on this and it was that mentors can be your mentors in different areas. So they can be a mentor spiritually, they can be a mentor mentally, physically, whatever. Like there are different areas for different people. But one of the guys I look up to and I do some work with is just got Howard, who's set up a podcast at the age of 77 years old. So when COVID was happening, he was. We met in February 2020. And in March I just followed up and then literally COVID happened like that, and I just said, hey, like can we reconnect? And for probably two and a half years, every morning not every morning, but every Sunday morning we would hop on the phone and again, with that value exchange, what he would say was he would just start telling me about his life and I'm like, holy shit, this is incredible. So I just start taking notes and what do you know, a month later, two months later, I send it over to him and I'm like, howard, this is all the notes I took. And he goes boy, we're gonna write a book. He goes, we're gonna write a book together. He goes. You are exchanging the knowledge. I need to share the information. It's 100 plus pages. Now we're in different businesses together, but it was just that idea of him being at such a level and him understanding that, hey, he always recognized in me that it was Jordan. You can do this even when you can't, and sometimes you need that because it's not easy every single day, especially in the fields that we're in, where you just rejection, rejection, rejection, rejection and you're like good, good, like another one, I'm closer to it.

Baz Porter:

Yes, look at you. It's interesting. You know where the rejection happens. Somebody once told me and I've just had this discussion actually on that mastermind prior to this conversation that they had a client and I can't say for an ownership person who this person is, but they had a client that was so angry because he lost a million dollars and they didn't know how to bring them out of that anger. And I just suggested it's not about the money, they dropped them into their hearts and because they're angry about what themselves? Because they didn't see something they should have seen. Yeah, and the guy just went oh crap, I've just had an epiphany and he hung up off the mastermind, the cold guy, to sort the issue out. That's incredible. It's the group coaching, like you said, and the ones on the recurring questions from other people that deliver the value and that's huge in person development and any business, anybody, some of these plants who are over successful and they have multiple businesses and they're business owners, not business operators and all the rest of it, and they travel around the world operating at these high levels. How the hell did? they do it Because there's a formula. But to discover that formula, you've got to ask the right questions and be in the right rooms, and this is what you did. Jordan is be in the right rooms and learn about other people. What was the two main takeaways in the last five years, four years since you started the marathon? What's the other two main takeaways that you've got through all the experiences you've had?

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, one of the biggest ones is realizing that everyone's got to put in their reps. It doesn't matter if you are handed everything, you're still gonna learn all the rules one way or the other. Because the thing is, I realized pretty quickly with the podcast, for example, because I started, that I did the first recording in February 2020 as well. It was a pretty transformable time. I didn't post anything until June of 2020. So that was like five months later. Then I didn't really get into a routine until I was like, okay, wait, I wanna do this, I wanna take over this. Because the thing is that those five months, like I just threw them away, not a good or bad way. But if I just did what I know now, if I took the podcast, clicked it up, put it on TikTok, when TikTok was super hot, like if I did all this stuff, who knows where you would be? And it's just the challenge of getting started. Like there are so many of us that say, oh, I wanna do this, I wanna do this, I wanna do this, I'm not gonna do this, blah, blah, blah. And then it's that moment of wow, I actually did it. And realizing also that maybe you're facing rejection, or you're not there yet or you're not at the point you wanna be yet it's because, shoot, you haven't faced enough rejection, you haven't done enough reps. You can't be upset at yourself. You only did one sales call every two weeks. You posted one podcast in six months. How could you have enough reps? There are people posting every single day and that has been one of the biggest realizations and the biggest kind of helpings for me is that realizing, wow, it's hard, it's not easy, and if it was easy everyone would do it. And they always say that stuff. But they don't realize that hey, it takes a lot of reps, it takes a lot of time. And then the other big takeaway is just realizing that we all have different goals and we're different people and we have different perspectives. And that doesn't make someone right or wrong, it just gives them a different viewpoint. And once we can see other people's viewpoints, we can understand situations a lot better, like, for example, for the audience. That understand this better is I've been in the host role so many times that I realized what BADZ is thinking, that I wanna leave enough wording for BADZ to go okay, that's a good one to grab onto, that could help. Or I'll just go BADZ. What are your two big takeaways in the last four years?

Baz Porter:

You know what I mean.

Jordan Edwards:

Cause it helps keep the flow of conversation. So for you, BADZ, what are some of your big takeaways?

Baz Porter:

Wow, that's a loaded question, cause I've been through it in the last couple of 18 months or so. One is the main one for me was never give up when you reach a certain level. Honestly, I have a story cause, I love stories and, as you know, you live for. TÉ. I had the privilege in 2019 of getting married to an awesome woman you've met. Her name's Nicola, and a person that you may or may not know turned up at my wedding. His name is Gerard Butler and he was completely unplanned. He wasn't, he was doing something else there. 10 minutes before I had got married, he said this to me enjoy the journey, enjoy every day of the journey, because when you reach the top of the mountain, it is so easy for someone to come and knock you off, and I remember that and I didn't really know what it meant until I reached a level of success within what I was doing and then someone tried to come and knock me off. In that journey, I learned leadership, patience and resilience and the ability that if you've put a message and you've got a passion to drive that message and come out from it, you learn all these experiences. But throughout the last year or year and a half, I had Gerard Butler in my head saying you got knocked off and now it's time to rise again, which is what prompted me to start the podcast or reignite the podcast. I already had this idea and then I remembered you being on a podcast with you and I looked you up and I was like he's doing not bad. I like this and it was about the level of impact you were giving in your podcast. So I actually modeled you, jordan, and went, okay, I'm doing this. But it was that it was coming back from the adversity, coming back from that hardship and being in the positions that I was in, and then that journey but where I'm coming out from, I've learned so much. I've connected again with so many other people and now it's time to level up. And in that journey to your point, you build up resilience, you build up the habits that work and, equally, you find out what is not working and get rid of it. And McDonald's on a marathon is not going to work. You're not going to stop halfway around and switch from a big Mac and cheese you could, but you're not going to feel very well in half an hour's time. But it's knowing what's working, what isn't working, and then actually applying it. Many people know it but they don't want to apply it because it becomes uncomfortable.

Jordan Edwards:

And you only know that from the experience of actually doing it. So they talk about oh, you read it in a book, so you know it. That's not always true. That's not always true. You could read books about podcasting, but actually doing them are very different and it's a different experience and it's a different comfort level. And it's how do you make this all happen? How does this work? What's the background? What's the this, what's the that? What's the background? It takes a rhyme, it takes reps. You can't and you can't be hard on yourself going oh man, I didn't do that correctly. The amount of podcasts I've done where I was like I forgot to hit the record button. Like it happens, it still happens Again.

Baz Porter:

by the way, it's a fantastic podcast, but I forgot to hit record.

Jordan Edwards:

Can we do?

Baz Porter:

it in about two weeks please.

Jordan Edwards:

Exactly, exactly. Even the virtualness of these things and like the virality and like being able to collect them up, it's just, it's so incredible. But I sit there because this is a concept I've been thinking about recently is when I would sit there. I was always like why wouldn't people buy the stock market when it's down, if they have all of their money in cash? It's because maybe they didn't have enough reps to purchase stocks. Because I sat there and I'm like, oh, this is really interesting. Like why would no one do a podcast and clip or clip themselves talking? Why would no one do this? Because they never recorded themselves to start up in the starting place. It's they never had the input, they never had the direction, they never had the reps, and that's why everything's reps, everything's understanding.

Baz Porter:

But it's not even about when people say I don't have a confidence. You can't get the confidence unless you start doing the thing you fear the most. You know it's like you in a marathon. You said earlier I've never run at more than six miles. Why the hell would I even attempt a marathon? But you did it and you can't complete it unless you start it.

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, and the thing that people don't realize about the marathon is that it's literally it was Hale Higgins, I believe it was. That was the formula, that was the route I used and what he says is literally run one mile, one mile, three miles. It's a 13 week program and it's like two miles, two miles, four miles, two miles, two miles, five miles. And it's just a 13 week program and it just takes a long time. It takes a long time to get these miles up.

Baz Porter:

But it's been a long time though.

Jordan Edwards:

In the scheme of life. In the scheme of life, it's not and it's something that goes wow, I put my mind to it and this was the whole point of the marathon that I was like if I could put my mind to this, then I could put my mind to getting rejected 100 times a day, like I could put my mind to facing my fears. I could put my mind to accomplishing these goals, because it's not just about fitness, it's about your mental and it's where do you sit?

Baz Porter:

I went to do something a while ago in Miami and for a good cause. I can't go into what it was. I had to go to Wells Fargo and pitch them something. Now, wells Fargo in Miami if you've ever been to Miami, there's a big tour building and to get to the director's office it's on the penthouse. It's very hard to get to. It took me four hours to get to the seat outside the director's office because I was a persistent person and I had a value offered to give to the director and I actually got to the director level. The only reason I didn't see the director is because he had a prior meeting and he was at the meeting was in another state so he had to leave. But on the way out I had 10 minutes with him while he was coming down the elevator and he donated $7,500 to the cause that I was after in the elevator. Wow, because I was persistent enough to go have that conversation with him. I started off at the very bottom speaking to the tellers and I went to the tele-management and I went to the next level and it took me four hours telling them the same thing. They were doing all these background checks to make it wasn't going to rob the place, etc.

Jordan Edwards:

But it was just kind of cool.

Baz Porter:

to get to that level took four hours, but in the relationship between four hours and the rest of my life, it's literally one second. It's less than a second, but I can have that experience and it's the persistent. The persistedness of telling the same thing and with the cause behind it has value.

Jordan Edwards:

What are?

Baz Porter:

the main things that you can recommend for somebody to me. You heard this said earlier failure. How would you refocus failure in your life?

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, I love that. And that's an incredible story, by the way, because what you did was you took the perspective and you spanned it out over your entire lifespan. Meanwhile, most people go, yeah, I spent half the day doing this and it worked out, which is cool, but, like, sometimes it doesn't. But, regarding failure, the way I do it is I look back on myself when I was, like you said, four or five years ago and I look back and I look at where I'm at and I go like, what a fit, like it's just funny, because if you have an earlier perspective of your life and you look at yourself and you go would that be a failure? No, you would sit there and go this is the best day ever, because you had no relationships, you had no deal flow, you had nothing happening. And then you look up and you go, wow, that was an amazing day. And so many times we get caught in the day to day minutia and we can't look up, we can't get above ourselves and see from 30,000 feet in the air five years back and having that different perspective of wow, that was incredible. But, yes, do I have, do I have days when I'm like, oh my god, we just had 10 failures in a row. Let's go, because that's the best thing, because we don't realize is that as an Entrepreneur, as someone who's trying to make a change, as someone who's trying to make a difference in the world, you are not gonna be accepted. You are gonna be forced to be in uncomfortable situations each and every time, like it's just, it is what it is, because there's no. I've done this a hundred times and I know what it's gonna be like. It's everything is new, which causes you to grow, which is what you want. Yeah, so if you fail, at least you learned. So that's how I view it. I always view failure as learning. And how do? How can I improve, how can I fix this, how can I change this? Because if we ask ourselves the question of like you were talking about before, the power of questions, if we ask yourself why am I such a failure, that's a terrible question. That is a horrible question. If we ask ourselves the question of what can I learn from this? We're getting a little more optimal, or it's wow, what did that person see that caused them to not understand what I would say. Now You're in a whole nother realm and it's just. You can start playing everywhere. But the thing is Also another big thing that I've learned is don't take it personal. It's not your fault. Like I had a meeting earlier in the day get canceled. I emailed the guy said thank you, can we reschedule for another time? Because, yeah, something came up. See, it's not even your fault. Like things happen. Things, things occur all the time and people respect you Exponentially more for how you react when that adversity happens. And I kind of like when people cancel, because if they cancel they're a little bit more indebted to you, they feel like yeah, I see that bad.

Baz Porter:

This is. This is what happened to me exactly yesterday. I had a I she's coming on the. She's coming on my podcast. I've known her for a while. I name is Natasha. She's an awesome human being and I know how busy her world is. I know what she does. I won't give away who she is right now Because it's a surprise, but I know that you know she was looking forward to the podcast Excerption. She went, she messaged me literally 20 minutes after the appointment ended and she was like oh my god, I'm so sorry I I didn't even see this on the calendar, I'm not busy, I Don't know. She was in Dubai and doing other things and coming across some crazy stuff in a lot, but this, that and I was like, yeah, no, I knew where she was and what, how busy she is. I didn't take it personally and to your point, which I love, don't take failure personally. It's not your fault that you don't know something. There's the old question. He has the old saying you don't know what you don't know. But ask yourself this question what if? And Then follow it with something that is endearing to you. It's a very powerful question what if? Because what if opens up so many other questions to that first thought you had and it you can add to it, you can expand on it. Failure is not something that is a rejection. It's a way to level up your life. People, I think, sometimes get it. I know you've Grasp the other side of failure, or the perception of it as a success, which I love and I know you've. You've applied it to each part of your life. Where do you find yourself going in the next five, five to ten years? Where do you want to be ideally, and how would you Share that impact with other people?

Jordan Edwards:

Yeah, of course. So for me, ideally, what I'd like to be doing is continuing on with the podcast, interviewing people around the world, getting to do more work of highlighting nature, more of meeting the individual, but also highlighting them in the regard of like hey, baz is working on this, baz is like an incredible guy, this is business, and it's just more of that real world nature. The other thing that I'm looking at doing is, ideally, like next year, I'm looking at living in different areas. So I did this back in 2020, where I was in Denver for a month, salt Lake City for a month, nashville for a month and just traveling around, and it was an incredible experience, mostly for me and my partner, but it also allowed me to do all of the things that I'm doing now. So I'd like to do that and take it to Europe and travel and really have a much bigger impact, speaking wise, continue to grow the groups so that it's not just people who are able to do it, but it's people that are wanting to do it and need to do this, and I'd really love to see the impact grow to an area where it's just each day people are like, wow, you've really changed my life, you've really done something different, because I find that there's so many careers and there's so many directions and there's so many things that are just so unfulfilling. They're so unfulfilling and if I can find something that slightly fulfills me and can really help me grow like for me right now, the things that make me light up, or podcast, which I love, love the deep conversation, love the presence, love that we're having this conversation together and it's really my coaching group those are the two things that are like, yes, I love it. Each time I finish, I finished the coaching group and my girlfriend like we have dinner right after and she's always like what's up? How was it? I'm like, I'm amazed, I'm great, like I'm having a great time because it's just cool, I just love that stuff and I think looking for more of that and trying to find more experiences and more lifestyles that align with that kind of energy is really what I'm looking for over the next five years.

Baz Porter:

And this is what I love about people like you, jordan, because you'd like to give back and you like to experience and you're really the old cliche of a go getter. But that is who you are, the person. You're not faking it until you make it like what people try to do. You're embodied, who you want to be and you're also leveling up in your life, which I think is a huge inspiration for others.

Jordan Edwards:

Can I hop in right here? That was incredible, because the thing that people most people don't realize is that when they talk on podcasts, they try to be the authority. However, as the host, you can always defer to the guests as the authority, in which case I post all the content highlighting the guests, because I don't I might not be the authority in whatever the guest is talking about. Like I've had someone talk about mushrooms, I had someone talk about the founding of Reebok. I'm not the expert in that, I'm just the expert in speaking with them and learning from them.

Baz Porter:

But, that said, you've defined what it is that you are and do. And to what you just said, it's not about me. I've not done this podcast because of me. As I said earlier. You inspire me to do it because it gave value to other people. This is what this is all about. A lot of us, including me in my younger days, forgot the value of giving equally as receiving. People are in this mindset of take, take, take, but they forget to give back. It's important we remember to do that. I've had that you just said about the podcast. I'm not the authority you are.

Jordan Edwards:

Absolutely, and even this morning, for the audience to have them have any action steps is. I legitimately went on a walk this morning and I took out my phone and I had to explain a situation to someone. I just sent them a voicemail. I'm like, wow, that saved me a 25-minute phone call. That was easy. Then what I realized is I sent out five more to different people, but not about anything going on, just saying hey, I'm really grateful for you, I'm glad you're in my life and I appreciate you. I sent one to my girlfriend and she was like I can't stop thinking about it because the thing is that's so good about this little thing takes 35 seconds. It is a surprise. People aren't ready for it and they don't get spoken to in a manner like that because they never get told how good they are of a person Like Baz. You're an incredible person. I appreciate you for having me on and it's gratitude and it's incredible being here, and we don't say that enough to people. I challenge the audience go out there, write down to three people and just let us know what the results were, because it's a simple task. You don't have to make the phone call, you don't have to talk to them, you just send them a voice memo and it's the most effective and efficient way to get people to feel good in this world. A lot of them came back with Jordan. You're the man I really appreciate this. You changed my life each day and I didn't ask for that, but that's what comes back.

Baz Porter:

I love that. Jordan, on a wrap up here, you've been an awesome human being. If you want to get hold of Jordan and appear on his podcast, there will be descriptions below. Please take advantage of this Again. Thank you very much, jordan. You're an awesome human being.

Jordan Edwards:

Absolutely. This has been amazing. Thank you, Baz.

Baz Porter:

Thank you very much, les and Jess. Until next week, have an awesome time, be safe, be well but, most importantly, be blessed. Thank you.

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